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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Hillary Clinton will be symbolically put forward as a presidential candidate at the Democratic convention later this month even though she narrowly lost the nominating battle to Barack Obama, the two campaigns said on Thursday. 

Obama encouraged Clinton’s name to be placed in nomination as a show of unity, the campaigns said in a joint statement that noted the two senators “are looking forward to a convention unified behind Barack Obama as the party’s nominee.” 

Clinton, a former first lady who would have been the first female nominee of a major party, narrowly lost the nominating battle to Obama in a drawn-out campaign that ended in June, months after John McCain wrapped up the right to represent the Republican party in the November election. 

Clinton later endorsed Obama, the Illinois senator who would be the first black U.S. president, and urged her supporters to line up behind him. 

But the hard-fought campaign left many of Clinton’s supporters bitter and wanting some recognition of the New York senator at the party convention in Denver beginning on August 25 since her chances of being picked as the vice presidential candidate have faded. 

Clinton is scheduled to speak on the second night of the convention, August 26, two nights before Obama accepts the nomination. 

“I am convinced that honoring Senator Clinton’s historic campaign in this way will help us celebrate this defining moment in our history and bring the party together in a strong, unified fashion,” Obama said in a prepared statement. 

(Reporting by Andy Sullivan, editing by David Wiessler)  

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