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By ZamChro Correspondent

Shangombo long known as the most primitive sport in the Zambian Enterprise has seen light following the construction of a thermo power station by ZESCO. 

Speaking at the opening ceremony, Western Province Minister, Adonisi Mufalali, said there was need to build a power station at the Siyoma Falls in Shangombo district.  

 

Siyoma Falls in Shangombo

Siyoma Falls in Shangombo

Mr. Mufalali said the power station could help avert the looming electricity shortage in the SADC region.

He further disclosed that the infrastructure can earn Zambia revenue through export of power to neighboring Angola.

He said the hydro power station at Siyoma Falls would also boost agriculture and tourism along the banks of the Zambezi.

Meanwhile, an Indian investor is to spend more than K17 billion on the establishment of a medical diagnostic centre in Zambia.  BHARAT Scans Managing Director, Rajamani Emmanuel says the centre will cut down on money spent on seeking medical attention in South Africa.

Dr. Rajamani was speaking in Lusaka when he met Professor, Neil Nkanza who runs Nkanza laboratories. And professor Nkanza said the diagnostic centre will also help save lives. The company signed a memorandum of understanding with government on Saturday.

Copyrights © 2009 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2009 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

 

 

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President elect  Barack Obama picks Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State.  Priceless
Great minds, are never Insecure. Barack  surrounds himself with big brains. The entire cabinet is a combination of brain powers.                                                                                                                                              

BARACKY II

Baracky 3!

This would have not been possible if there was no freedom of speech. Americans were given the power to elect and vet their leaders.

Each and every candidate’s laundry basket was visited by every American with the help of media and bloggers, without fear that they will be arrested.

In the end America elected the candidate they thought sold more to them,

and yes supporters created all this without fear: Videos like one below shows freedom of speech

I wonder if we do have that kind of freedom of speech in Zambia to be able to vet our leaders before they get elected.

Just looking at the polls tells a lot. Freedom of speech and the process in place in vetting our leaders should be implemented.

 WHAT HAPPENED TO THE ELECTIONS ON OCTOBER 30 2008?

Can you imagine if one of us created Videos that smacked our candidates left, right and center? Guess what would have happened ? Arrested, and possibly jailed for visiting the incoming leader’ s laundry baskets.

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and dissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

 

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NEWLY-APPOINTED Vice-President George Kunda has said that he is ready for the challenges of the office as President Banda’s second-in-command.

Mr Kunda said in an interview in Lusaka yesterday that his appointment as Vice-President entailed that he assisted in realising the President’s vision on improving the standards of living for Zambians.

“I am ready for the challenge and will provide the necessary assistance to the Government. I believe I am qualified to take up such a responsibility,” he said.

On the fight against corruption, Mr Kunda said that Government would have to put in place measures that would make the fight against corruption more effective.
He said the Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC) in consultation with other stakeholders has developed the proposed policy.

LT

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

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Esther Phiri Rises to Prominence Despite Limited Sponsorship Avenues in Southern Africa
By JOSEPH J. SCHATZ
Special to THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
August 4, 2008

LUSAKA, Zambia – Just a few years ago, Esther Phiri was a struggling single mother with a sixth-grade education selling vegetables on the street in Mutendere, an impoverished neighborhood of Lusaka, Zambia’s capital.

Last month, Ms. Phiri left Africa for the first time as a world boxing titleholder.

[Esther Phiri]
Landov
Esther Phiri (left) lands a punch against Kelli Coffer during a 2006 boxing match in Nairobi that Ms. Phiri won in an upset, sparking her surprising rise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After winning the Women’s International Boxing Federation (WIBF) super featherweight world title – her third title — three months ago, Ms. Phiri left Zambia July 8 for a three-week European training tour designed to expose her to top-level international talent and, her managers hope, pave the way for a title fight in Europe or the United States.

“Exposure is very important, not only in Africa,” Ms. Phiri, 25, noted as she sat inside the Lusaka offices of her corporate sponsor, the National Milling Corporation Ltd. “Life has changed.”

For over a century boxing has been known as a long-shot avenue to success for athletic strivers from poor areas. But Ms. Phiri’s rise from the slums to stardom as Zambia’s first female boxing champion sounds extreme even by her sport’s standards. It is also a window into the challenges and opportunities of the sports business in Africa – and how Ms. Ms. Phiri and her corporate promoters have parlayed her prowess in the ring into the highest profile sports endorsement in the history of this peaceful but stubbornly poor southern African country.

One of eight children, Ms. Phiri grew up in a two-room house, and financial pressures forced her to leave school in the sixth grade after her father died. By the age of 16, she was pregnant.

But through a local non-governmental organization focused on HIV awareness and sports, Ms. Phiri began boxing and developed the punching technique that in 2003 brought her to the attention of Anthony “Preacherman” Mwamba, a retired Zambian boxer who had advanced to the quarterfinals of the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Now a trainer and promoter, Mr. Mwamba saw promise in her and began training her and started arranging fights.

After a series of unimpressive first bouts, Ms. Phiri entered a fight with Ohio’s Kelli Cofer, the reigning WIBF Intercontinental Junior Lightweight titleholder, in Nairobi in 2006. Ms. Phiri shocked the spectators by winning an eight-round decision.

Suddenly she was a champion. But that posed a problem – her team had to come up with the money to stage a title defense.

[Esther Phiri and Anthony Mwamba]
Joseph J. Schatz
Esther Phiri with her trainer and manager, Anthony Mwamba.

Promoting athletics – much less women’s boxing – is difficult in Zambia, which has seen its economic fortunes fluctuate with the price of copper, its major export, since becoming independent from Great Britain in 1964. Despite recent economic growth, neither Zambian corporations nor the government have much room in their budgets for sports.

“I had a vision, I had talent, but I had no sponsors,” Mr. Mwamba says. He approached Peter Cottan, general manager of National Milling, a former government-owned company. Now a subsidiary of U.S.-based Seaboard Corp., the company produces the cornmeal that Zambians use to make their national staple, a white porridge called nshima.

Looking to improve his company’s image, Mr. Cottan decided National Milling would pay for the fight, at a cost of about $18,000. Then, he said with a laugh, “I held my breath for the whole of the eight rounds. It was a fantastic, exciting experience.”

Ms. Phiri beat her Bulgarian challenger, and the next day Cottan brought Ms. Phiri and Mwamba into his office and signed her up to a binding and exclusive two-year endorsement deal as the company’s “brand icon.” That means Ms. Phiri wears National Milling gear, appears on billboards across Zambia touting the “Mealie Meal of Champions” and goes on road shows demonstrating products.

In return, the company is responsible for sponsoring all of her fights, managing the events, feeding and clothing Ms. Phiri and her team and paying the costs of her education. Purse money is negotiated fight by fight, and the company pays her a monthly retainer of $3,000, a huge sum in Zambia, and also pays Mr. Mwamba. The company’s total commitment is about $100,000, according to Mr. Cottan.

That may represent a huge sum in Zambia, but it remains a pittance when compared to what women boxers in other parts of the world can command. American Laila Ali counts Adidas AG among her sponsors, pulling in millions of sponsorship dollars a year, and ranks among the world’s top female athletes. Major athletes in southern Africa typically go abroad before signing endorsement deals. “It’s normal in the West, but it’s not normal in this area,” Mr. Cottan says.

Still, Ms. Phiri has become a household name in Zambia, and her fights draw government ministers and chanting children. The government gave her a house in a middle-class Lusaka neighborhood, where she now lives with her mother, her 9-year old daughter, and her late sister’s four children.

After defending her Global Boxing Union super featherweight intercontinental title against Puerto Rico’s Belinda Laracuente last November in a controversial decision, Ms. Phiri silenced some critics with a convincing win over Germany’s Elina Tissen to take the WIBF world title in April. Ms. Phiri, whose record now stands at 7-3-1, already held the WIBF intercontinental title.

Once teased by male boxers, Ms. Phiri now spars with them and says she hopes to be a role model for girls in a country where many women face cultural hurdles in everything from education to property rights – and where she is now held up by many as a sign of women’s progress. Ms. Phiri’s unusual status as a wealthy female athlete in a fairly traditional African culture draws intense and often sensational local media coverage. Her personal and business decisions have become quite public. Just last week Mr. Cottan made banner headlines for saying that Ms. Phiri shouldn’t rush her marriage plans, lest they complicate her boxing career.

And as a national heroine, Ms. Phiri gets no shortage of advice from all corners. None other than Zambia’s president, Levy Mwanawasa, last year wrote to Ms. Phiri’s managers warning them to let her rest adequately between fights.

To be sure, for her corporate sponsors and promoters, Ms. Phiri’s success isn’t simply a heartwarming rags-to-riches story – she’s making them money, as Mr. Cottan is not shy to explain. “Now, National Milling is on the tip of everyone’s tongue,” he notes.

While getting other corporate sponsors for women’s fights in Zambia remains difficult, Mr. Mwamba hopes Ms. Phiri’s rise will prompt new support for Zambian athletes, like the two Zambian boxers who will compete in the Olympics next month in Beijing.

As Ms. Phiri trains and spars in Denmark, Germany, Sweden and the Netherlands, her team is looking beyond her Oct. 4 bout in Lusaka with American boxer Angel McNamara. Mr. Mwamba says the key will be improving her footwork.

“We want to show the world she can even do it outside the country,” he says.

Write to Joseph J. Schatz at joseph.schatz@gmail.com

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Lusaka, Jul 13 (Prensa Latina) Zambia’s President Levy Mwanawasa got better although he is still in Mercy Parisian military hospital, reported Sunday Vice President Rupiah Banda.

The recent medical report noted that doctors in charged of Mawanawasa feel satisfied with the patient’s revival.

Mawanawasa had suffered a concussion during his participation in the African Union Summit in Sharn el Sheik in Egypt.

For that reason he was urgently moved to Paris medical facility where he was operated on to make him breathe easier.

 

Comment From Zambian Chronicle Below:

Please keep the first family in your thoughts and prayers; they need them more than any insinuations and Webfetti.cominnuendos right now. Honoring and praying for those who are ill is the most honorable Zambian thing to do … 

 

Get well soon, Mr. President; can’t wait to fly you back home so you can continue kicking some butt, you got a lot of work cut out for you.

 

Live Long & Prosper; Long Live Levism … thanks a trillion. 

 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.  

CEO  & President – Zambian Chronicle

 

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

 

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc

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No one really knows who wrote the lyrics to the song “I’ve Got the Power” but it was popularized by C&C Music Factory. The song is so voguish that it is in most movies and other ultra-vires theatrical settings.

 

As amusing and implausible as this may sound each one of us … “Got the Power”. The only power others have over us is only the one we of our own volition give to them, I have always said.

 

Your boss, your spouse, your parliamentarian, your congressman or woman, your senator and yes your president only has power given to them as a mandate through either your vote or otherwise. So, what is power? And what kind(s) of power(s) is/are there? Where does the full potency of power culminate? For a country the full potency culminate in the presidency or premiership for elected office and in a monarchy or oligarchy, otherwise. For an enterprise, full potency culminates in the executive officer.

 

Power is the ability to exert influence … it multiplies the incumbent’s ability to effectively perform. Whether it is referent power – based on personality and charisma, expert power – due to skills, abilities, knowledge or experience, position power – derived from a position one holds or coercive power – dependent on fear of repercussions; it all culminates in the executive, private or public.

 

As a business consultant and accountant, one of the major business structures l look for in an organization is its power structure even before considering operational structures – in fact substantive analysis has a lot to do with power structure analysis pursuit to fraud detection before a thorough audit could be conducted for any going concern.

 

Power brokers have the ability to build an enterprise, they have the ability to conceal its operations and they have the ability to destroy it. Corporations around the world spend billions of dollars training their top echelons on their ability to handle power.

 

Power is best handled by those who have experienced power before but it has different levels and leagues. Just because one can handle it in one league does not mean one can automatically handle it in another.

 

One of the greatest disasters in the history of the Zambian Enterprise occurred when we elected FTJ, he was mandated alright but he had no capacity to handle power at that level and the rest is now history.

 

No one can deny that FTJ had referent power that produced high powered charisma but he seriously lacked expert power from which skills, abilities, knowledge or experience are derived thus ending up being a calamity to the extent of revealing epitomes of national security such as tunnels at State House.

 

While he held position power, he lacked coercive power; consequently the quintessence of his presidency ended with him wanting more power (third term) instead of giving it away.

 

His third term bid almost disjointed his party the MMD, to the extent of creating offshoots such as Christon Tembo’s FDD, Ben Mwila’s ZRP, Michael Sata’s PF, Godffrey Miyanda’s HP, just to mention a few.

 

Because FTJ could not empower others properly then, he lacks power today – a sharp contrast with his predecessor. KK handed over power even when he constitutionally could have said, no thanks a trillion …

 

KK read the nation’s mood and knew it was time to hand over showing great leadership qualities by choosing peace over power, FTJ did not and pushed his luck; he broke his party apart and when he came back to his senses, no amount of damage control could work for him.

 

Each one of us is the embodiment of power and we only give it to whoever we choose to … We Got the Power!!! We are all in the empowering business; empower your business, empower your employees, empower your spouse, empower your children, empower your boss and you will be empowered in return.

 

Power works in circles, that which you empower will ultimately empower you in return; you got the power … Since power is derived from those around us, the more of it we give away the more of it we get back. You can easily empower yourself by simply empowering others.

 

Unfortunately, not every one can handle power. Your ability to empower is therefore sacred because when power is in wrong hands, some of its repercussions are irreversible and the quash is true when it is in the right hands. Empower wisely, people …

 

Power in right hands can do a whole lot of good and power in the wrong hands could be catastrophic – power is a two-edged sword. If one can’t handle power withdraw it without hesitation, your actions would be for the common good.

 

When power is in the right hands, there is justice, harmony, tranquility, peace, synergy and prosperity for all; everybody talks about ubuyantanshi but when it is in the wrong hands every body is discombobulated.

 

“Bane twikatane, tubombeshe, tutwale ichalo cesu pantanshi, development, development,development and more national development – everyone talks development and nothing but!!!”

 

For some though, it is not that they can’t just handle power but that they have some growing to do before they can handle it at a higher level. The remedy to such is not to withold totally but to give it to them incrementally otherwise they would self-destruct … you have to grow them, so to speak.

 

Because Zambia is greater than any single one of us, next time we go to the polls to elect our next CEO, all the smart people of the Zambian Enterprise need only to remember one thing … We Got the Power!!!

 

A lot of struggles in life have to do with power struggles, I personally do not struggle with anything or anyone in my life and when I see struggle, I shun it, shut it down and move away …

 

I know what kind of material I am made of and I have also learnt over the years that there is a lot of winning in losing most times … I’ve Got the Power!!!

 

Live Long & Prosper; that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion. 

 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO  & President – Zambian Chronicle 

 

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

By Zamchro Correspondent

I found this article on-line published by Nairobi Daily News,  Kenya. The article in Bold was written by

Tajudeen is deputy director UN Millennium Campaign, Africa.


A quote by African opinonist  Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem:

There is a carnivalesque celebration across Africa about Senator Barrack Obama becoming the Presidential candidate for the Democrats in next November’s elections in the US.

The excitement is such that one would be forgiven for thinking that Obama was about to be sworn in. The enthusiasm ignores the fact that he is yet to be formally adopted and still has an election to fight against the Republicans. Nowhere is this excitement more infectious than in Kenya, the homeland of Obama’s father.

Quote from Daily news -Nairobi Opinion:

“Kenyans are not alone. I am not sure how many of the millions of Africans now jubilating about Obama’s possible victory, would be that enthusiastic were Obama to be standing for office in their own countries. Can you imagine an Obama as a presidential candidate in Ivory Coast?”

Would he not be reminded that he is not African enough? How could he pass the ‘ivoirite’ test when even a former Prime Minister of the country, born in the country was disqualified? If Obama had stood in a Nigerian election would he have generated the same mass adulation?

This is a continent in which a former President (Kenneth Kaunda), founding father of Zambia and a man who served as President for 25 years, had his citizenship stripped by his successor Chiluba (a small-minded small man) because his parents allegedly came from a neighbouring country (not even another continent) The former President of Tanzania, Benjamin Mkapa, had the citizenship of a number of Tanzanians annulled because they (or he suspected that they) disagreed with him politically.”

Zambians did not strip the first Zambian President Dr K Kaunda’s citizenship. He ruled Zambia for 27 years. It was just time for change, unfortunately, there was only Chiluba who came forward to challenge his long leadership. Though Mr Chiluba was just another hypocrite. What ever treament he gave Dr K Kaunda, has come back to bite his own butt.

As part of his campaign of prolonging his gerontocracy, President Mugabe stripped many Zimbabweans of their citizenship. The journalist Trevor Ncube was declared a Malawian, but his siblings who were not considered sympathisers of the opposition, remained Zimbabweans.

Ethiopia and Eritrea shamelessly engaged in tit for tat denationalisation of innocent citizens because of the senseless war between the two leaders. There are so many examples of routine denial of citizenship across Africa.”

The ease with which political opponents are foreignised in Africa would never permit Obama to dream of becoming a local councillor, let alone aspiring for the Presidency in an African country. Even within the same country, claims of who is an indigene, a settler, a resident, and so on, are used to disempower fellow citizens.”

 

 

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