Al Gore


By Zamchro Correspondent

I found this article on-line published by Nairobi Daily News,  Kenya. The article in Bold was written by

Tajudeen is deputy director UN Millennium Campaign, Africa.


A quote by African opinonist  Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem:

There is a carnivalesque celebration across Africa about Senator Barrack Obama becoming the Presidential candidate for the Democrats in next November’s elections in the US.

The excitement is such that one would be forgiven for thinking that Obama was about to be sworn in. The enthusiasm ignores the fact that he is yet to be formally adopted and still has an election to fight against the Republicans. Nowhere is this excitement more infectious than in Kenya, the homeland of Obama’s father.

Quote from Daily news -Nairobi Opinion:

“Kenyans are not alone. I am not sure how many of the millions of Africans now jubilating about Obama’s possible victory, would be that enthusiastic were Obama to be standing for office in their own countries. Can you imagine an Obama as a presidential candidate in Ivory Coast?”

Would he not be reminded that he is not African enough? How could he pass the ‘ivoirite’ test when even a former Prime Minister of the country, born in the country was disqualified? If Obama had stood in a Nigerian election would he have generated the same mass adulation?

This is a continent in which a former President (Kenneth Kaunda), founding father of Zambia and a man who served as President for 25 years, had his citizenship stripped by his successor Chiluba (a small-minded small man) because his parents allegedly came from a neighbouring country (not even another continent) The former President of Tanzania, Benjamin Mkapa, had the citizenship of a number of Tanzanians annulled because they (or he suspected that they) disagreed with him politically.”

Zambians did not strip the first Zambian President Dr K Kaunda’s citizenship. He ruled Zambia for 27 years. It was just time for change, unfortunately, there was only Chiluba who came forward to challenge his long leadership. Though Mr Chiluba was just another hypocrite. What ever treament he gave Dr K Kaunda, has come back to bite his own butt.

As part of his campaign of prolonging his gerontocracy, President Mugabe stripped many Zimbabweans of their citizenship. The journalist Trevor Ncube was declared a Malawian, but his siblings who were not considered sympathisers of the opposition, remained Zimbabweans.

Ethiopia and Eritrea shamelessly engaged in tit for tat denationalisation of innocent citizens because of the senseless war between the two leaders. There are so many examples of routine denial of citizenship across Africa.”

The ease with which political opponents are foreignised in Africa would never permit Obama to dream of becoming a local councillor, let alone aspiring for the Presidency in an African country. Even within the same country, claims of who is an indigene, a settler, a resident, and so on, are used to disempower fellow citizens.”

 

 

Posted: 03:00 PM ET
From CNN AP

Gore has not ruled out a future presidential run.

Gore has not ruled out a future presidential run.

(CNN) — After remaining neutral throughout the Democratic primary season, former Vice President Al Gore is officially backing Barack Obama’s presidential run, and will appear with him at a Michigan campaign event Monday night.

“A few hours from now I will step on stage in Detroit, Michigan to announce my support for Senator Barack Obama,” said the 2000 Democratic presidential nominee in a fundraising e-mail sent to supporters Monday. “From now through Election Day, I intend to do whatever I can to make sure he is elected President of the United States.”

Former presidential candidate John Edwards also announced his decision to endorse Obama at a rally in the crucial fall swing state

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September 30th, 2007 

By Momar Visaya/Asianjournal.com  

NEW YORK — World leaders, CEOs, celebrities and scholars gathered for the opening of the third annual Clinton Global Initiative conference. 

Former President Bill Clinton welcomed the participants from 72 countries and the 52 current and former heads of States who made their way across town from the UN General Assembly. “We are faced with problems that the government is not solving, or the government cannot solve alone,” Clinton said. 

President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and former US Vice President Al Gore led the opening plenary. They were joined by Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai, Walmart President and CEO H. Lee Scott, Jr., Archbishop Emeritus and spiritual leader Desmond Tutu and The World Bank Group President Robert Zeellick. 

Clinton introduced the opening plenary panelists, and prefaced his introduction of President Arroyo. He proudly announced that Arroyo was an old friend and a college classmate at Georgetown University. “We’ve been friends for a long, long time,” Clinton said of Arroyo, “and her country’s economy is on the way up and it’s in a very good shape.” 

The former US president also acknowledged the fact that the Philippines “had its fair share of internal conflict brought about by differences in ideology and religion” and asked Arroyo how her government is trying to promote reconciliation in the country. 

“We have developed a paradigm for peace in Mindanao using both soft and hard power,” Arroyo remarked. Soft power, she explained, is about development, while hard power focused on military efforts to attain peace. 

“We do it through interfaith dialogues to promote lasting peace and political stability in our country,” Arroyo said, and explained that her government has been exerting efforts to deepen understanding among various faiths and cultures particularly in parts of Mindanao. 

The annual meeting is the epicenter for global philanthropy and the forum for people who want to get involved and to make a difference. “We’re here because the world is bedeviled by growing inequality. We’re here because we accept our shared responsibility for correcting our problems and we’re here because we believe we can make a difference,” Clinton said. 

The conference is focused on finding ways to solve some of the world’s most pressing problems such as lack of education, poverty alleviation, global health, energy and climate change. Among the notable attendees were former British Prime Minister Tony Blair, celebrity couple Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, tennis star Andre Agassi and media mogul Rupert Murdoch. 

Former Vice President Gore brought in more passion to the plenary by sharing his thoughts and ideas about how the world needs more action, rather than talk. “The US has to lead the world in solving this climate crisis and I challenge President Bush to take that step,” Gore said, “The effort to solve the climate crisis is the key to solving other problems.” 

On the other hand, Archbishop Desmond Tutu brought in the lighter side, nonetheless thought-provoking. “Someone in San Francisco approached me and said, ‘Archbishop Mandela!’,” he said laughing, “two for the price of one.” 

Clinton introduced Tutu, saying that he had one of the best one-liners at the conference last year. The archbishop likened religion to a knife. “You can use it to slice bread, which is good, or you can also use it to slice off your neighbor’s arm, which is bad,” he said. 

Arroyo said that terrorists use religion to cause warfare and that something must be done in order to promote more understanding. President Karzai summed it up, saying that it is the “misuse of religion for political purposes that creates the problems.”

In her closing remark, Arroyo thanked Clinton for the opportunity to share to the world that the Philippines had a 7.5% growth rate in the last quarter. 

The last remark, from Desmond Tutu, capped the opening plenary. “How about us helping God realize His utopian dream? God dreams that we could all live in harmony as members of one family – the gays, the lesbians, the so-called straight…,” he said, as he was cut-off by a thunderous applause, and as the camera panned to Clinton, the former president remarked smiling, “It’s up right there with the knife comment.”  

Meanwhile, according to Zambia National Broadcasting Corporation, Dr. Mwanawasa urged countries in the west to redeem themselves before criticizing China for giving more aid to Africa.

Speaking when he answered questions from members of staff of the Clinton Global Initiative, the president said governments in the west were often reluctant to finance development projects in Africa. 

Dr. Mwanawasa said Africa and Zambia in particular is in a hurry to develop and China has come out a dependable partner. The President said very soon, China will embark on a $900 million economic zone project on the Copperbelt where over 60,000 people will be employed.  

The president said also said those wishing to help the country develop are most welcome. On the Zimbawean question, Dr. Mwanawasa reiterated that if Mr Robert Mugabe is not invited to the EU/Africa summit scheduled for Portugal in December, then the whole SADC region will not attend.  

He said the SADC member states strongly feel that isolating Mr. Mugabe was not the answer. Dr. Mwanawasa, who is also the SADC chairman, said the leaders in the region were well resolved to continue engaging Mr. Mugabe in dialogue rather than isolating him as the west would rather do.