Cristina Fernandez


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2007-05-16-zambia-3_200.jpgFollowing our last memo on Maureen Mwanawasa As Zambia’s First Female President  a lot of interest was generated as to what the qualifications for the CEO of the Zambian Enterprise should be. 

First of all, we wish we could say it was all about the academic and or professional qualifications that should dictate one’s ascension to the highest office in the land. Unfortunately that’s just not the case … 

flag.gifThere are a lot of variables in play that make up the right mix to that ascension, however, and we would like to explore some of those in this week’s memo.

There are only two primary qualifications; one being one’s age and the other one’s nationality as dictated by our current constitution.  Others are predicated upon a fundamental concept of systems theory, a way of thinking about the world, a model that is followed wherever party politics are practiced.

With the above in mind the rest are up for the grabs and whoever can work the system to the fullest extent apparently ends up being the president of the Zambian Enterprise. We say working the system because that’s exactly what it is. A system is a set of interacting or interdependent entities, real or abstract, forming an integrated whole.

Being man-made systems, democracies normally have certain purposes and or objectives. They are designed to work as a coherent entity and whoever aspires to the office has to have a good understanding of their operational capacities. 

Systems are determined by choosing the relevant interactions we want to consider, plus choosing the system boundary and or, equivalently, providing membership criteria to determine which entities are part of the system, and which entities are outside of the system and are therefore part of the environment of the system. 

There are also closed systems and open systems but in a political environment one has to work within a closed system called a political party. It is no wonder no one wakes up and says he would be president tomorrow because a system has to be in place for one to achieve such an objective. 

Now, within a closed system are also other variables to consider such as membership, name recognition, positioning, timing, synergy and a whole lot others. While membership and name recognition are  the basic requirements, positioning and timing feed on each other to be functional. 

Synergy on the other hand is group determined, in other words the people within the system decide to choose leadership based on the maximum good for the collective. It is at this stage that they look at one’s qualifications; academic, professional and or otherwise as the best sale for their franchise. 

What we see in the first lady is her ability to work the system if she wants to be the next CEO of the Zambian Enterprise and with all operational capacities in place, the MMD as a  franchise can provide her the nomination which is hers for the taking unless of course she is not interested. 

classy-daddy-3.gifSo, with all the bluff and fluff about qualifications, it is all back to the basics otherwise we could have had the most educated and or professionally qualified person as the president of the Zambian Enterprise by now. 

Lastly, any such person wanting to make the grade can only be successful if they realized the importance of working within a system and that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion. 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.  

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First Lady Maureen Mwanawasa is pictured at the launch of the HIV/AIDS prevention campaign, “Real Man, Real Woman”. Photo by Zambia In-Country TeamCan Maureen Mwanawasa be Zambia’s first female president? We think so!!!

Recently during the cabinet reshuffle HE Levy P Mwanawasa, SC. encouraged NEC (National Executive Committee for the MMD) to start thinking about his successor. 

Dr. Mwanawasa also mentioned that he had someone in mind that he felt NEC would have no objections to … whoever that person is and or could be, we at the Zambian Chronicle are not privy his choice.

But with the advent of female presidents around the globe, we think that the First Lady would have an easy sail through the MMD nomination process. 

There are several reasons why this might happen among them being that Dr. Mwanawasa’s popularity is at an all-time high within the Zambian Enterprise.  Thus at the end of his term, it goes without saying that whoever he endorses would carry the day as his successor. 

The other reasons are but not limited to the fact that, we Africans seem to love continuity more than change and should the current first lady be interested in running for State House, more of the president’s supporters would feel more comfortable with that scenario as they would still envision Dr. Mwanawasa at the helm. 

Also, world trends seem to be moving in that direction. In Argentina, former first lady Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner won the country’s presidential election in a peaceful vote, while Hillary R Clinton might be the first female US president next year in what may be one of the toughest races in history. 

Should Mrs. Mwanawasa seek the nomination, she would have a lot of things working for well for her. Among other things unlike our first two first ladies, she is more up to the task, educated, articulate, more diplomatic as well as classy-daddy-3.gifpresidential.

She is seen from inner circles as the brain behind a lot of good initiatives in the current administration and she is very likeable. 

UDA can then re-unite and let Nawakwi run so she can be beaten once and for all – sorry Edith but we just had to throw that one in; and that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion

 

 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

   

 

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By Lester Pimentel

Oct. 29 (Bloomberg) — Argentine bonds gained after first lady Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner won the country’s presidential election in a peaceful vote, dashing concern that the weekend could be marred by violence and claims of fraud.

“It’s post-election relief,” said Claudia Calich, who manages $1 billion in emerging-market debt for Invesco Inc. in New York. “There’s always a possibility that things can go wrong in any election.”

The government’s benchmark bond due in 2033 rose 4.25 cents on the dollar to 99.25 at 4:24 p.m. in New York, pushing the yield down 39 basis points to 8.34 percent, according to JPMorgan Chase & Co. A basis point equals 0.01 percentage point. The bonds also gained on speculation that Fernandez may make a restructuring offer to creditors who held out of the country’s 2005 debt renegotiation.

“There’s market talk they may revisit the issue and offer better conditions,” Luis Costa, an emerging-market strategist at ING Bank NV in London.

Holders of about $20 billion of defaulted Argentine debt rejected the government’s 2005 offer that paid about 30 cents on the dollar. Failure to reach an accord with the holdouts has prevented Argentina from tapping international credit markets.

With 96.4 percent of polling stations reporting, Fernandez, a 54-year-old senator, had 44.9 percent support, compared with 23 percent for ex-congresswoman Elisa Carrio and 16.9 percent for former Economy Minister Roberto Lavagna, the electoral commission reported. Carrio conceded defeat early today.

The risk of owning Argentine bonds fell to the lowest since Oct. 18, according to data from Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. Five-year credit-default swaps based on the country’s debt declined 13 basis points to 3.74 percentage points. That means it costs $374,000 to protect $10 million of the country’s debt from default.

Emerging-Market Bonds

Argentine local bonds also gained. The yield on Argentina’s 5.83 percent inflation-linked peso bonds due December 2033 fell 9 basis points to 7.60 percent, according to Citigroup Inc.’s unit in Argentina. The bond’s principal is adjusted based on the inflation rate. The yield is the lowest since Sept. 21.

Argentina’s rally led gains in emerging-market bonds today. The extra yield investors demand to own emerging-market dollar bonds instead of U.S. Treasuries narrowed 3 basis points to 1.97 percentage points, according to JPMorgan’s EMBI Plus index. The risk premium is the lowest since Oct. 18.

To contact the reporter on this story: Lester Pimentel in New York at lpimentel1@bloomberg.net

Source: http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=aWSbSxxA.X3g&refer=news