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By Ndangwa Noyoo

Published:Nov 16, 2008

On Obama:

Africans have a penchant for passing the buck and expecting prosperity to fall from heaven whenever issues of national development come to the fore. What does this assertion have to do with the Obama victory?

Well, for starters it points to the very nature of ineptitude that continues to shape our people’s psyche and their misguided belief that Africa’s woes will be solved by some miraculous intervention by some super being.

However, to the contrary the pitfalls of Africa’s development can only be rectified by Africans themselves. Therefore, Africans should not expect Obama to come to their rescue after they have failed to put their houses in order due to corruption, mal-governance, tribalism, nepotism, mediocrity and national paralysis shaped by myopic leaderships.No one but the Africans can free themselves from this on-going socio-economic and political malaise. Africans have to redeem themselves and not expect anyone to realize this noble ideal. Yes, it is good to see a mixed-race individual (Obama is neither black nor White, but a blend of the two.

However, Africans claim him more for obvious reasons), becoming president of the most powerful nation on earth. Indeed, it is gratifying to note that the twenty-first century has debunked the myths of a racist America whereby talent and hard-work has now prevailed over bigotry and half-truths.This is the lesson that Zambians should draw from the Obama campaign and eventual rout of the Republicans. That with the hard-work, talent and fortitude, a person can be credited on merit to either become president of Zambia or hold public office.

It should not be based on one’s “connections”, tribe or brown-nosing. Also, we should recognize the fact that education absolutely matters. Zambia, like all African nations is a modern state. It is part of a fast-paced technological and economically advancing global community.

It is not a small village. Therefore, the acumen to lead such an entity is first and foremost dependent on inta alia, education. Obviously, there are also other personal attributes such as honesty, humility, care for those who are disadvantaged, etc.Conversely, the electorate also needs to be educated and enlightened. An illiterate and uninformed electorate will not be able to choose the caliber of leadership that will speak to policy options for national development, but rather, will be mesmerized by demagogues, ideologues, populists or alarmists.

Until the day that Zambia (and Africa in general) is led by sober, competent and visionary leaders, the ordinary people will continue to wallow in their poverty and misery.

Copyright © 2008 Ndangwa Noyoo.  All rights reserved.

Disclaimer: Author is a freelance writer, therefore opinions and ideas shared in the above article may not necessarily be those of the staff and management of the Zambian Chronicle.  The original text has been modified to fit Zambian Chronicle content and multi-media structure.

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.


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Meet Hakainde – His Profile

 

Hakainde Thinks Public Service Is A Noble Enterprise – Thus The Decision To Enter Politics

 

Hakainde On The Economy

 

Hakainde On Investments

 

Show Me The Money – Hakainde Excogitates

 

Hakainde On Education

 

Hakainde on Infrastructure Development & Constitution Making

 

Hakainde Talks About Media & Press Freedom

 

Hakainde On Transparency & International Relations

 

Luapula Women Sing – Hakainde Muchele Nowa Mukene Akatobela …

(Hakainde Is Salt Even If You Once Denied It, You Would Dip Into It Nevertheless …)

Disclaimer: Zambian Chronicle looked for clips for other Presidential Candidates but found none, thus the only interview posted is that of Hakainde Hichilema. It is for this reason that we have asked our audience to furnish us with info to the contrary and we are willing to pay for such publication(s) so other candidates would be accorded equal airtime.

 

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

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The old adage “practice makes perfect” holds true to every locale in the human enterprise  and or in everyone’s life. The upcoming presidential by-election will usher in a 4th president for the Zambian Enterprise, democratically elected in a peaceful transfer of power.

 

While others may want to just take this for granted, we at the Zambian Chronicle realize its importance and significance that we just had to write home about it. On a continent filled with rage and at best incumbents’ desire for lifelong presidencies, the Zambian Enterprise leads the pack in many ways.

 

In fact, other than ours in the Sub-Saharan region, Botswana is the only country that boosts of holding the longest record in peaceful transfer of power with democratically elected presidents and its economic stability speaks volumes of its own.

 

All things being equal, democracies have the ability to bring out the best among the collective; the people and not the system(s) become the means through which society chooses for itself what its desired posterity should be.

 

No one single person becomes more powerful than the sum of the all and by so doing it (a democratic system) creates checks and balances for the mutual benefit(s) of both the system and its peoples. Of all other latent issues, democracy tends to create a system of correcting wrongs with the greatest of ease.

 

Take the emergence of multiple party politics in 1991, for instance. The Kaunda era though vibrant at first could not stand the test of time. This is because it was built on flawed communistic policies and no amount of humanism preaching by KK or even Archangel Gabriel could improve anything otherwise at all.

 

The fact is simply that communism does not work, however perfectly envisioned even in a perfect world. Man is impenitently self-interested and when there is nothing for him/her but for the collective he/she tends to be ineffective at best.

 

It is no wonder every body during the latter Kaunda era developed a “Niva Boma” attitude. One was not obligated to anything and “Waco ni waco” (nepotism) swelled and huge misappropriation of all resources led to corruption and other graft devices.

 

When FTJ came on the scene, he really did not have any message at all but the smart people of the Zambian Enterprise gave him a chance all because they were ready for change. They were promised privatization, and without asking for accountability they went along because they had hope the time for “Niva Boma and Waco in Waco” had come to an end.When they matched through the streets chanting “The Hour, The Hour, The Hour Has Come”, to many others it did not matter whether or not that hour had come for them to be unemployed, that hour had come for them to be without medical coverage, free hospitals and free education; it mattered dimly squat what that “hour that had come” meant.

 

Most smarts even mistook democracy for privatization I often remark … but the system worked. This is not to say, there was no corruption, this is not to say peoples’ perception about “Niva Boma and Waco ni Waco” changed, in most cases these were actually amplified.

 

The Chiluba regime proved that too much power bestowed in the presidency was erroneous and corrective measures were taken, it also proved that zeal without knowledge is murderously dangerous for any enterprise and we started replacing rhetoric with execution starting with Levy P Mwanawasa, SC.

 

We learnt that government works better when it is accountable to the electorate and not the other way round. We learnt that there is still a lot of international goodwill out there as long as a nation is willing to do the right things, by taking the right steps, every time, all the time …

 

And overall, as every one adhered to good governance, bad apples were being identified and exposed, culprits brought to book including FTJ himself and the system got perfected day by day, thanks a trillion in great part to Levism (MHSRIP).

 

Levy had his share of mistakes too but we will leave those for others to comment at the present moment. But we know that he did his best to turn the economy, the work culture and posterity around; at each and every stage, he had the best interest of our Enterprise at heart …

 

After next week, the smart people of the Zambian Enterprise are heading to the polls again, in part to prove the system works but overall, to perfect it even further.

 

Oh yes, practice makes perfect and we encourage all the eligible smart people of the Zambian Enterprise to go the polls en masse, it’s our God given right, make use of it …

 

We once said here that not much would be expected out of this by-election because it is more of a care-taker presidency until the Tripartite General Election in 2011.

 

But we encourage even losers to understand that there is a lot of winning in losing and moving the nation forward after conceding – there can only be one president at a time.

 

Whoever becomes the next CEO of our Enterprise, we at the Zambian Chronicle will render our full moral support just like we did for Levy.

 

We will criticize him when we see mistakes made not because we want to be vocal for nothing by using our bully pulpit but because Zambia is greater than any single one of us.

 

Whatever the outcome, the real winner will be Levy P Mwanawasa, SC. who proved the system works and practice makes perfect, Long Live Levism!!!

 

Live Long & Prosper; that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To all my fellow Zambians:

Good luck with the Zambian elections in October 2008. I am sure we will pick the right candidate to continue where the late President Levy P Mwanawasa, SC. left from (MHSRIP).

For those of you that are endorsing HH, I hope he carries his nation at heart, and puts the Zambian people first before politics. I have no doubt that with his credentials he can take the Zambian Enterprise to the next level.

Here is a clip candidates should start watching closely, and if HH really wants to preach change, and take the Zambian Enterprise to the next level, he should know it takes people to seek change.

If the smart people of the Zambians Enterprise are looking for change, they need to support the Candidate for change, which in this case I can see most of you are endorsing HH. Take a close look at USA presidential elections.

Does this sound familiar?

Does it sound like Zambian economy? Well it’s happening in America. That is what happens when you put wrong people in office all the time.

Candidates need to lay down their plans in a meaningful, and practical way. Not waffling around same old policies. Ideas, Ideas, the key to success. Here is another example:

 

In Zambia we have had same candidates rotating from one position to another, they all descended from UNIP. We need another president like the late Mwanawasa to continue fighting corruption, and take our country to the next level.

A candidate who would put the Zambian interests first before his own, one who would empower his own people and create jobs. One who would allow foreign investment, but put Zambians that are innovative on top of the list.

I hope we all take time to know the candidates well. The ball is in our hands, people. Pay attention to what our candidates are saying. We need a president who will be able to understand our most needed issues within the Zambian Enterprise as a whole.

A candidate who understands the outside world as well and has foreign policy credentials. One who understands economics, because whether we like it or not, what ever goes on around the world has significant impacts our own economy.

Take time to screen candidates in and out before we cast votes. We need a candidate who is strong, dedicated, never gives up, honest, intelligent, humble, compassionate, innovative and creative. One who sees beyond his nose and makes right decisions at least ninety-nine percent of the time.

Here is another clip.

And for politically minded women, who are aspiring to stand for President in 2011, do not get discouraged, you can do it. Here is a role model for women.  I edge our Zambian men to stay open minded when it comes to women leadership. We women get things done. Hillary ran an incredible campaign …

… and the opposition picked this candidate for VP to overshadow Hillary’s historical campaign. Of course this one is not my choice, though I am sure some Zambian women would like her since she has five children youngest is only 4 months. She is a joke to me because she was handpicked. On a good and humorous note though, she is not afraid to take on a challenge!!!

Having said that, I would like to see women participating in Zambian presidential elections. I am calling upon intelligent Zambian women to take up the challenge in 2011.

I wonder why the Zambian constitution can’t open up for presidential candidates to pick their running mates before they are elected in office. This is an important point for us to seriously think about before the 2011 elections.

It is very crucial to have running mates screened at the same time with their presidential candidates. We have all seen what happens when a sitting president dies in office, the Vice President jumps in to act as president.

Wouldn’t be nice to have the VP get screened before hand? Transparency is very important …

Live Long & Prosper; that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion. 

 

Belliah K Theise

Chief Operating Officer – Zambian Chronicle 

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.  

 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc. 

 

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By Times Reporter

ELECTORAL Commission of Zambia (ECZ) chairperson Florence Mumba has assured the nation that the commission will ensure that it delivers a credible presidential election to be held within 73 days.

Justice Mumba, however, said the forthcoming election was unprecedented and it was important that all stakeholders worked together.

Officiating at a workshop for council secretaries and town clerks in Kabwe yesterday, Justice Mumba said the remaining 73 days before the election could be held was a big challenge but she was convinced it would be fulfilled if stakeholders worked together.

She said following the death of President Levy Mwanawasa, the ECZ had realised that it needed a competent poll staff database that could be called on at short notice when the need for an election arose.

The ECZ would be required to train and supervise all electoral staff that included returning officers, presiding officers and polling assistants in the short time remaining before the election.

After the training, the ECZ would only pick on those that would demonstrate practical knowledge and competence of the electoral process.

She acknowledged that the presidential election would be a litmus test and would determine how the commission was capable of responding to a sudden challenge.

The ECZ had started preparing for the 2011 polls and had challenges in areas such as procurement and logistics but were now being compounded by the short notice in which the polls were to be held especially that Zambians expected nothing but the best polls.

Justice Mumba also cautioned civic leaders to be mindful of the sensitivity of their work by avoiding any behaviour that might compromise their standing in society.

“Remember that our stakeholders are watching and they do not expect any unprofessional conduct from us,” she said.

She made an undertaking for the ECZ to do its work in a transparent, impartial and efficient manner for the polls to meet the aspirations of the people.

Kabwe Town Clerk Vivian Chikoti hailed the ECZ for its decision to hold its first preparatory presidential election workshop in Kabwe, a town that was steadily regaining its economic glory.

In a vote of thanks, Kitwe Town Clerk Ali Simwinga said the training would assist the participants discharge their electoral duties in a diligent manner to warrant a free and fair election.

 

© 2005 Times Printpak Limited. All Rights Reserved.

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05 September 2008
 

Butty interview with Mbita Chitala – Download (MP3) 
Butty interview with Mbita Chitala – Listen (MP3)   

Two days after the late Zambian President Levy Mwanawasa was laid to rest, the National Executive Committee of the ruling Movement for Multiparty Democracy (MMD) meets Friday to choose its candidate in the forth-coming presidential by-election. The two top contenders are Vice President Rupiah Banda who is acting head of state and Finance Minister Ng’andu Magande.

Friday’s meeting also follows comments by former first lady Maureen Mwanawasa suggesting that her late husband preferred Magande as his successor. But Mwanawasa’s will, which was broadcast Thursday night on state radio and television made no reference to succession.

Mbita Chitala is a senior member of the ruling MMD. He told VOA that Zambia is a democracy and not a monarchy and the party will most likely choose Vice President Banda.

“I have been tapped by my party to advise as to who in my view should be a better candidate to represent us and let us win to retain the leadership of the country. And we have suggested that the current president Rupiah Banda who was the vice president for the last two years would be our best candidate,” he said.

Chitala said Vice President Banda, who is now acting president deserves to lead the party because of his many qualities.

“One of them is that we have the vice president of the country who is also senior trustee in our party and most qualified in terms of education and otherwise. We feel that he is truly would be the most representative of the country as well as the most experienced among those who may wish to vie,” Chitala said.

Former first lady Maureen Mwanawasa reportedly told a local newspaper last week that her late husband preferred Magande as his successor.

But Mwanawasa’s Will, which was broadcast Thursday night on state television and radio made no reference to succession. In stead the late president said he did his best to improve the standards of living for Zambians.

He talked about his strong belief in national development, good governance, the rule of law and democracy and his fight against corruption.

Mwanawasa expressed regrets in his will that in the process of fighting for the good of his country he may have forsaken himself.

“I regret that in my zeal to facilitate this fight, I lost friendship with a number of some of my best friends and at many times my own life and those of my family members were threatened,” Mwanawasa said in his will.

Chitala said the late Mwanawasa could not have mentioned succession in his will because Zambia is a democracy and not a monarchy.

“As regards the alleged will of our former president, unfortunately our country is not a monarchy. We are a democracy, and the way the founders of our party enshrined the democratic principles of succession, there has to be election among the contending members. And President Mwanawasa was a very good friend of mine, and we used to discuss these matters and as far as I knew him, he could never depart from the doctrine of democracy and become the monarchy behavior person,” Chitala said.

He accused former first lady Maureen Mwanawasa of once having an interest in succeeding her husband.

“To the contrary, I think that has just been unfortunate politics by the former first lady who herself had shown interest of wanting to succeed her late husband. But of course our custom doesn’t allow such kind of behavior, and we advised her that if she wants she can go out for a while may be mourn the late husband for at least year before getting back in politics,” Chitala said.

The late President Mwanawasa was revered for growing Zambia’s economy. But Chitala said Finance Minister Magande is not the architect of the economic success under late President Mwanawasa.

“Magande was never the architect. In fact that was the policy of former President Frederick Chiluba, and you know in economics the gestation period of programs takes many years. But one thing you cannot take away from Mr. Mwanawasa is that he was very dedicated to good governance,” he said.

Chitala dismissed suggestion that Vice President Banda, who is 71 years old, maybe too old compared to Magande.

“That is not correct. Mr. Banda was made vice president and senior trustee of the party and makes him qualified to be the candidate for president. In respect to age, yes he’s 71, but of course this is a transition period between now 2011, and we think that he is the best person to give us this transition. He is very energetic as far as we are concerned and we think he will be the best person to give this transition. Mr. Magande himself I think he’s 62 or 63,” Chitala said.

Source: Voice of America

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