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By Shapi Shacinda

LUSAKA (Reuters) – Zambia has enough currency reserves to protect the economy in case the illness of President Levy Mwanawasa prompts some reduction in foreign investment, central bank Governor Caleb Fundanga said on Tuesday.

Fundanga said the only slight worry of the Bank of Zambia (BoZ) was rising oil and food prices, which threatened its single digit inflation target. However, he remained optimistic of achieving 7.0 percent annual inflation in December this year.

Fundanga said it was evident the illness of Mwanawasa, who is in a French hospital after suffering a second stroke, had caused anxiety among some investors but that there was “no need for panic”.

“The investors in the mines will continue exporting copper. It is possible that … some investors may decide to pull out, but we have enough reserves, $1.4 billion held by the Bank of Zambia and another $1 billion by commercial banks,” Fundanga told a news conference, adding Zambia had 5.6 months of import cover.

Mwanawasa impressed the International Monetary Fund and other Western donors by cracking down on government spending and launching an anti-corruption drive.

Fundanga said Zambia had investment pledges totalling $1.8 billion so far this year compared with just $1 billion in the first six months of 2007. The government has previously said a number of these investments have been fulfilled.

“Naturally, as a result of the illness of the captain, as some refer to the president, there are some people who might be feeling uncomfortable. Given this situation, are we vulnerable? Will all forex (foreign exchange) dry up? The answer is ‘no’,” Fundanga added.

He said mining and non-traditional sectors had continued to perform satisfactorily with copper export earnings for the three months to June just 0.1 percent lower than the previous quarter’s earnings, at $967.6 million.

Fundanga said non-traditional exports at $187.6 million at end-June were 12.3 percent above the $167.1 million recorded in the previous quarter ending in March.

“Favourable export earnings have led to the strengthening of the external sector reflected in the appreciation of the kwacha against major currencies and a 10 percent increase in international reserves to $1,338.4 billion in June 2008 from $1,216.3 billion in March 2008,” he said.

There were inflationary pressures from a 15 percent wage increase for civil servants from January and from higher global oil prices, which would put pressure on transport and commodity prices.

“However, these pressures may be mitigated by pass-through effects of the appreciation of the exchange rate of the (Zambian) kwacha against major currencies on account of external sector performance,” Fundanga said.

Fundanga said the kwacha appreciated 11.3 percent against the dollar in the three months to June to trade at an average of 3,259/dollar.

“We cannot give up on 7.0 percent inflation at the end of the year because we have enough food to feed ourselves and we will not necessarily be affected by global food prices,” he added.

(Lusaka newsroom + 260-977843609/260-955779523)

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BERLIN — The dollar sank to a new low against the euro Wednesday on pessimism about the American economy and speculation Washington will soon cut interest rates again.

The euro spiked to $1.4855 before retreating slightly to $1.4787 in morning European trading. It broke the $1.48 mark for the first time on Tuesday, settling at $1.4815 late in New York.

The dollar also hit a two-year low against the Japanese yen, falling to purchase as little as 108.81 yen before rising slightly to 109.19 yen – compared with 109.69 yen in New York on Tuesday. It was last lower when it purchased 108.76 yen on Sept. 5, 2005.

The British pound was down slightly to $2.0639 from $2.0667 in New York.

The euro, the pound and other currencies have been climbing steadily against the dollar since August amid fears for the health of the U.S. economy, stoked by the subprime credit crisis.

Surging oil prices – which rose to a new record high above $99 in early Asian trading Wednesday – have driven up commodity-backed currencies such as those of Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

The dollar has been further weakened by U.S. interest rate cuts – which can be used to jump-start an economy, but can also weaken a currency as investors transfer funds to countries where they can earn higher returns.

On Tuesday the U.S. Federal Reserve released the minutes of its October meeting and its economic forecasts for the next three years, which suggested to investors that a December rate cut was imminent given the state of turmoil in credit markets and the Fed’s forecast of decreasing inflationary risk – contributing to the dollar’s weakness.

© 2007 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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By NANCY MWAPE

LuSE abandons plans to link itself to JSE

THE Lusaka Stock Exchange has abandoned an ambitious plan to link with Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE)- Securities and Exchange due to cost considerations.

 

Johannesburg Stock Exchange – Africa’s Largest

Last year, LuSE indicated that it was scouting for US$1.1 million to link its operations with JSE Securities and Exchange by this year.

LuSE had also said the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation was studying LuSE’s plan and would fund the project.

But responding to a press query, LuSE general manager, Beatrice Nkhanza, said plans to link with JSE had been abandoned for various reasons among them the cost considerations.

“Plans to link LuSE to JSE have been abandoned for various reasons.

LuSE therefore is going it alone…by sourcing and financing of the system, just like Nairobi, Dar-es Salaam and Botswana,” she said.

Mrs Nkhanza however pointed out that LuSE was in the process of sourcing and installing an automated system and was currently consulting.

She stated the automated system would be operational sometime next year.

Mrs Nkhanza said in the region, only Namibia Stock Exchange was linked to the JSE Securities and
Exchange.

The aim of linking with JSE Securities and Exchange was to integrate network of national securities market in the region.

In 1997 at Livingstone’s Sun hotel, a committee of Southern Africa Development Community Stock Exchange was formed to integrate stock exchanges, make markets liquid and improve their operations.

By last year September, member States that included South Africa, Botswana, Namibia, Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia had harmonised listing requirements.

Getting LuSE linked with JSE securities and Exchange was expected to create a central point for inflow of foreign portfolio investment and enhance LuSE’s exposure to investors.

Other expected benefits included improved liquidity across multiple markets and LuSE being able to be seen on the London Stock Exchange via JSE Securities and Exchange.

Zambia Daily Mail

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KARRATHA, Australia (AP) — For nearly three decades, Chinese peasants have left their villages for crowded dormitories and sweaty assembly lines, churning out goods for world markets. Now, China is turning the tables.

art.china.cars.ap.jpg

Robert Yu, president of Chinese car maker ZhongXing Automobile Auto, presents models in Tijuana, Mexico.

Here in the Australian Outback, Shane Padley toils in the scorching heat, 2,000 miles from his home, to build an extension to a liquefied natural gas plant that feeds China’s ravenous hunger for energy.

At night, the 34-year-old carpenter sleeps in a tin dwelling known as a “donga,” the size of a shipping container and divided into four rooms, each barely big enough for a bed. There are few other places for Padley to live in this boomtown.

Duct-taped to the wall is a snapshot of the blonde girlfriend he left behind and worries he may lose. But, he says, “I can make nearly double what I’d be making back home in the Sydney area.”

The reason: China.

For years, China’s booming economy touched daily life in the West most visibly through the “made-in-China” label on everything from clothes to computers. But now, economic growth is giving rise to something more that can’t be measured just by widgets and gadgets — a shift in China’s balance of power with the rest of the world.

China’s reach now extends from the Australian desert through the Sahara to the Amazonian jungle — and it’s those regions supplying goods for China, not just the other way around. China has stepped up its political and diplomatic presence, most notably in Africa, where it is funneling billions of dollars in aid. And it is increasingly shaping the lifestyle of people around the world, as the United States did before it, right down to the Mandarin-language courses being taught in schools from Argentina to Virginia.

China, like the United States, is also learning that global power cuts both ways. The backlash over tainted toothpaste and toxic pet food has been severe, as has the criticism over China’s support for regimes such as Sudan’s.

To understand why China’s influence is increasingly pushing past its borders, just do the math.

When 1.3 billion people want something, the world feels it. And when those people in ever increasing numbers are joining a swelling middle class eager for a richer lifestyle, the world feels it even more.If China’s growth continues, its consumer market will be the world’s second largest by 2015. The Chinese already eat 32 percent of the world’s rice, build with 47 percent of its cement and smoke one out of every three cigarettes.

China’s desire for expensive hardwood to turn into top-quality floorboards for its luxury skyscrapers has penetrated deep into the Amazon jungle. For example, in the isolated community of Novo Progresso, or New Progress in Portuguese, one of the biggest sawmills was started by the mayor with financing from Chinese investors.

China accounts for 30 percent of the wood exported from logging operations in remote towns across Brazil’s rain forest, where trucks carry the finished product hundreds of miles along muddy roads to river ports, said Luiz Carlos Tremonte, who heads an influential wood industry association. Many Chinese purchasers now travel to Brazil to clinch deals, and are almost always accompanied at business meetings by friends or relatives of Chinese descent who live there.

“Ten years ago no one knew about China in Brazil; then the demand just exploded and they’re buying a lot,” Tremonte said. “This wood is great for floors, and they love it there.”

The Bovespa stock index in Brazil has climbed more than 300 percent since 2002, riding the China wave.

China is buying coal mining equipment from Poland and drilling for oil and gas in Ethiopia and Nigeria. It has poured hundreds of millions of dollars into Zambia’s copper industry. It is the world’s biggest market for mobile phones, headed for 520 million handsets this year. The list goes on.

Along with looking to other countries for goods for its people, China is also going far and wide in search of markets for its products.

In war-torn Liberia, where electricity is hard to come by, Chinese-made Tiger generators keep the local economy humming. Costlier Western brands, favored by aid agencies and diplomats, are beyond the reach of small business owners such as Mohammed Kiawu, 30, who runs a phone stall in the capital, Monrovia.

A used Tiger generator costs around $50, he said over the steady beat of his generator. “But even $250 is not enough to buy a used American or European generator. They are not meant for people like myself.”

The Chinese generators are more prone to break down, Kiawu said. When the starter cable snapped on one, he replaced it with twine. But by making items for ordinary people, he predicted, China “will take control of the heart of the common people of Africa soon.”

China is having to make up for decades of economic stagnation after the communist takeover in 1949.

When Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping began dabbling in economic reforms in 1978, farmers were scraping by. By 2005, income had increased sixfold after adjusting for inflation to $400 a year for those in the countryside and $1,275 for urban Chinese, according to China’s National Bureau of Statistics.

“The Chinese don’t want war — the Chinese just want to trade their way to power,” said David Zweig, a professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. “In the past, if a state wanted to expand, it had to take territory. You don’t need to grab colonies any more. You just need to have competitive goods to trade.”

If China stays on the same economic track, it would become the world’s largest economy in 2027, surpassing the United States, according to projections by Goldman, Sachs & Co., a Wall Street investment bank. And unlike Japan, which rose in the 1980s only to fade again, China still has a huge pool of workers to tap and an emerging middle class that is just starting to reach critical mass. Many development economists believe China still has 20 years of fairly high growth ahead.

But the transition to a larger presence on the global stage comes with growing pains, for China and the rest of the world.

As Beijing plays an ever bigger role in the developing world, some Western countries fear it could undermine efforts to promote democracy. In its attempt to secure markets and win allies, China is stepping up development aid to Africa and Asia. Chinese President Hu Jintao pledged last year to double Chinese aid to Africa between 2006 and 2009, promising $3 billion in loans, $2 billion in export credits and a $5 billion fund to encourage Chinese investment in Africa. China has also promised Cambodia a $600 million aid package and agreed to loan $500 million to the Philippines for a rail project.

But China also extends aid to states such as Myanmar, Zimbabwe and Sudan whose human rights records have lost them the support of the West. Actress Mia Farrow has labeled next year’s Beijing Olympics — a point of pride for China — the “genocide Olympics” because of China’s support for Sudan, at a time when the West seeks to punish it for its military actions in Darfur. China buys two-thirds of Sudan’s oil output.

“In some ways, it will be integrating us into a new international order in which democracy as we’ve known it or the right to open organized political activity is no longer considered the norm,” said James Mann, author of “The China Fantasy,” a book about China and the West.

China is also facing some of the unease that powers before it have encountered. In Africa and Asia, some complain that massive China-funded infrastructure projects involve mostly Chinese workers and companies, rather than create jobs and wealth for the local population. And Moeletsi Mbeki, a political commentator and brother of South African President Thabo Mbeki, likens the trade of African resources for Chinese manufactured goods to former colonial arrangements.

“This equation is not sustainable,” Mbeki said at a recent meeting of the African Development Bank in Shanghai. “Africa needs to preserve its natural resources to use in the future for its own industrialization.”

The backlash is also coming on the consumer front, with Chinese goods earning a dubious reputation for quality. In the United States, there is a furor over the standard of Chinese imports. In Bolivia, vendors peel off or paint over any indication that their wares were “Hecho en China,” Spanish for “Made in China.”

A woman selling bicycles in El Alto, a poor city outside the capital, La Paz, insisted they were made in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan or even India. With some prodding, she acknowledged the truth. “They’re all Chinese,” she said, declining to give her name lest it hurt her business. “But if I say they’re Chinese, they don’t sell.”

Even those who benefit from China’s growth express some wariness. Aerospace giant Boeing expects China to be the largest market for commercial air travel outside the United States in the next 20 years, buying more than $100 billion worth of commercial aircraft, U.S. trade envoy Karan Bhatia said in a recent speech.

“Right now, we’re hiring every week,” noted Connie Kelliher, a union leader. “Things couldn’t be better.”

Yet Boeing workers remain wary of China’s ambitions to build its own planes. next year China plans to test-fly a locally made midsize jet seating 78 to 85 passengers. It has also announced plans to roll out a 150-seat plane by 2020.

“It’s kind of a double-edged sword,” Kelliher said. “You want the business and we want to get the airplane sales to them, but there’s the real concern of giving away so much technology that they start building their own.”

That’s what happened to Western and Japanese automakers, which made inroads in the Chinese market only to see their designs copied and technologies stolen. Already, China’s vehicle manufacturers are venturing overseas, exporting 325,000 units last year — mostly low-priced trucks and buses to Asia, Africa and Latin America.

“We’re taking a bigger piece of the pie,” said Yamilet Guevara, a sales manager for Cinascar Automotriz, which has opened 20 showrooms in Venezuela in the past 18 months, offering cars from six Chinese makers. “They ask by name now. It’s no longer just the Chinese car. It’s the Tiggo, the QQ.”

China’s biggest car company, Chery Automobile Co., just announced a deal with the Chrysler Group to jointly produce and export cars to Western Europe and the United States within 2-1/2 years.

Given the speed of China’s ascent, it’s perhaps not surprising that China itself is trying to calm some of the fears. Its slogan for the Beijing Olympics: “Peacefully Rising China.”

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Former U.S. Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan said it is possible that the euro could replace the U.S. dollar as the reserve currency of choice.

According to an advance copy of an interview to be published in Thursday’s edition of the German magazine Stern, Greenspan said that the dollar is still slightly ahead in its use as a reserve currency, but added that “it doesn’t have all that much of an advantage” anymore.

The euro has been soaring against the U.S. currency in recent weeks, hitting all-time high of $1.3927 last week as the dollar has fallen on turbulent market conditions stemming from the ongoing U.S. subprime crisis. The Fed meets this week and is expected to lower its benchmark interest rate from the current 5.25 percent.

Greenspan said that at the end of 2006, some 25 percent of all currency reserves held by central banks were held in euros, compared to 66 percent for the U.S. dollar.

In terms of being used as a payment for cross-border transactions, the euro is trailing the dollar only slightly with 39 percent to 43 percent.

Greenspan said the European Central Bank has become “a serious factor in the global economy.”

He said the increased usage of the euro as a reserve currency has led to a lowering of interest rates in the euro zone, which has “without any doubt contributed to the current economic growth.”

© 2007 Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

By press time of the article above, the US Federal Reserve had not yet announced its intentions to cut benchmark rates by half a percentage point.

As of the time of this posting the rate stood at 4.75% bringing new surge in the markets around the world with the Dow Jones gaining over 300 points in one day … thanks a trillion.

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

Market Reaction Around The World …


StarPhoenix

Interest rates decision spurs Australian stock market
Melbourne Herald Sun, Australia – 1 hour ago
THE US central bank’s decision to slash interest rates for the first time in four years spurred the Australian stock market to its biggest one-day rise in a
Fed Cuts Rate Half Point, and Stock Markets Soar New York Times
Fed lowers interest rate, and stock markets soar Kansas City Star
Fed’s Rate Cut Korea Times
TheStreet.com (subscription) – San Jose Mercury News
all 2,326 news articles »


Aljazeera.net

Asia markets soar after US rate cut
Aljazeera.net, Qatar – 8 hours ago
Asian stock markets have seen strong gains, following the first cut in US interest rates for four years. Shares on Wednesday were up by more than 3 per cent
Asia Stocks Jump After Wall Street Surge Washington Post
Most Asian markets lower; Tokyo stocks fall amid renewed concern International Herald Tribune
Financials weigh on Asian stock markets Financial Times
Euro2day – Euro2day
all 393 news articles »


StarPhoenix

Toronto stocks seen rising on commodities
Reuters Canada, Canada – 3 hours ago
TORONTO (Reuters) – Toronto’s main stock market index was seen opening higher on Wednesday as the US Federal Reserve’s bigger-than-expected interest rate
Stocks surge post-Fed Globe and Mail
Toronto stocks steady ahead of Fed decision Reuters Canada
Toronto stocks steady before Fed decision Reuters Canada
Globe and Mail – The Canadian Press
all 146 news articles »


Montreal Gazette

Clash Of The Emirates
Forbes, NY – 21 hours ago
could give Nasdaq an extra-thick financial shield against the ambitions of Dubai as well as more investment in international stock markets for Qatar.
Stockholm shares close lower, but OMX up on M&A speculation – UPDATE Forbes
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Hindu

Stock markets, rupee scale record highs
Earthtimes.org – 2 hours ago
The 30-stock Bombay Stock Exchange sensitive index (Sensex) rose 653.63 points or 4.2 percent to 16322.75 at close. All the components of the index were
Markets surge on Fed Reserves rate cut buzz Business Standard
Sensex breaches 16000 mark; up 653 points at close Zee News
Sensex recovers initial losses in late morning deals Hindu
Hindu – Economic Times
all 87 news articles »

Stock Market Update – Wed Sep 19 12:00:01 EDT 2007
Reuters – 11 minutes ago
5.5% gain in the stock. The feeling that the market is getting a bit overbought on a short-term basis could invite some afternoon selling interest.

Stock Market Update – Wed Sep 19 09:45:01 EDT 2007
Reuters – 2 hours ago
COM] The stock market has started the session on an upbeat note as the good vibes from yesterday’s trading continue to be felt.

Global stock markets rally after US interest-rate cut
Belfast Telegraph, United Kingdom – 8 hours ago
Stock markets across the world are continuing to rally amid signs that the global credit crunch is starting to ease. The rally follows a decision by the US

Stock Market Update – Wed Sep 19 10:35:01 EDT 2007
Reuters – 1 hour ago
COM] Buying interest has calmed after the excited start that followed yesterday’s rate-cut rally and the huge gains in foreign markets overnight.


Capital News 9

After Fed cut, debt market problems persist
CNNMoney.com – 1 hour ago
Global stock markets cheered Tuesday after the central bank cut the target for a key short-term interest rate. On Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrial
AP Executive Morning Briefing The Associated Press
Debt Market Looks to Fed to Restore Confidence New York Times
Wall St. awaits the other Fed guy CNNMoney.com
CNN-IBN – USA Today
all 157 news articles »

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The Zambian Enterprise is not only the largest producer of copper in Africa; it also has a perfect track record to enable it to vie for a “World Class Credit” rating.

Usually referred to as “first credit” in economic terms, the rating would enable Zambia to issue international bonds and enter the elite class with incentives similar to those in developed nations.

Should this take place, Zambia whose economy currently accounts for only 1 percent of Sub-Saharan Africa’s $544 billion economy, would be the third country on the continent to issue such bonds.

“… if we went for a rating, we’d be able to issue a euro-kwacha bond for example … the country will probably seek its debut rating “shortly,” … there has never been a better time than this … with a buoyant economy and a good track record, I think it’s about the right time to subject ourselves to a rating,”… said the Manchester educated and one time professor of economics at the University of Zambia now Bank of Zambia Governor – Dr. Caleb Fundanga without being date specific.

The European Investment Bank, the finance arm of the European Union, in December 2006 sold 500 million pula of senior unsecured bonds, with settlement and payment in euros, the first-ever international issue in Botswana’s currency, according to Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services.

South Africa, the continent’s largest economy and Botswana, the nation with the highest rated debt in the continent, are the only southern African nations with foreign currency denominated bonds.

Zambia has a lot of support and may need to fully capitalize on that support if reality has to come. Out-going World Bank country manager was one of Zambia’s strongest advocates to the same.

“… Zambia is clearly one of the countries where the impact of debt relief has been massive and could be very clear,” Ohene Nyanin, the former World Bank’s country manager based in Lusaka, said in an interview. “It is a very big fiscal space that has been opened up.”’

The country’s inflation rate dropped to single digits for the first time in 30 years in April 2006 as the government moved to control spending. Zambia has also benefited from a fivefold rise in the price of copper, which accounts for 53% of the enterprise’s income.

International bonds are a certificate of debt issued by a government or corporation guaranteeing payment of the original investment plus interest by a specified future date and have the ability to increase cash inflows at an accelerated rate thereby increasing a country’s liquidity.

classy-daddy-3.gifTwo to three years ago, I introduced a bond phenomenon on Zambia Online and even suggested the issuance of bonds as a debt instrument necessary for capitalizing the New Zambia Airways as a private enterprise.

It was to be privately driven and ran; some nay sayers rose up to short the idea down but yet even today more experts are vying for a bond rating that would elevate the country’s standing as well as help grow our economy above 7% come next year.

It is highly feasible that some critics were new to the subject and saw no benefit to the Zambian Franchise at all … thanks a trillion.

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

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EASY STEPS FOR ZAMBIANS ABROAD AND FOREIGN INVESTORS TO INVEST ON THE LuSE

The Lusaka Stock Exchange (LuSE) has received numerous queries from investors abroad on the operation of its stock market. In response, the LuSE has now made arrangements for Zambians abroad and foreign investors to easily buy and sell shares on its market. Please follow the notes and guidelines below.

Step 1: OPEN A SHARE ACCOUNT WITH A LuSE STOCK BROKER
Select a broker of your choice from the list at the back and fill in an e-mail application form to open your share account. Upon receipt of your e-mail application form, the LuSE Broker should send you a note to confirm that your share account has been opened at the Central Share Depository [CSD] of the LuSE.

The Broker should also advise you of your share account number.

A copy of your application form will be sent to the LuSE by your broker for verification and recording.

Step 2: SEND MONEY FROM YOUR BANK TO YOUR BROKER IN ZAMBIA TO BUY SHARES ON THE LuSE

Zambians abroad and foreign investors can easily send money to their appointed broker with instructions to purchase shares on the LuSE. Call your broker for their bank account details.

CUSTODIAN BANKS – AN ALTERNATIVE OPTION FOR INVESTORS ABROAD

The LuSE has two custodian banks, namely Barclays Bank Zambia Ltd and Stanbic Zambia Ltd. Custodian banks provide safe custody of funds and securities in Zambia for both domestic and investors abroad.

The custodian bank receives instructions from the client [investor abroad] and executes these in the domestic market. For a buying transaction, the custodian bank will receive the funds from the investor abroad.

The custodian will then monitor the entire transaction, and release funds when the buy order has successfully been traded, cleared and settled on the LuSE. After settlement, the custodian may [if the client requests] proceed to hold the shares in a custodian sub-account in the CSD of the LuSE, on behalf of the investor abroad. The contact details for the LuSE custodians are shown at the back.

Step 3: OBTAIN A CONTRACT NOTE FROM YOUR BROKER – This is important!

Once your order to buy or sell has been traded (matched) at the stock exchange, the LuSE produces a trade confirmation report to your broker. Your broker is then required, under the Securities Act, to issue you a Contract Note within 24 hours. The contract note is the legal confirmation of the transaction. You should therefore receive an e-mail contract note from your broker to confirm that your buy or sell order has been matched on the LuSE and that the transaction will be irrevocably settled with finality 3 days after the trade (T+3].

Contract notes should be filed and kept under the safe custody, as they are legal proof of the transaction.

SETTLEMENT
3 days after the trade, termed T+3, [excluding weekends and holidays], the matched trades are settled by the LuSE Central Share Depository. This settlement involves two simultaneous steps – the movement of money [payment] from the buyer to the seller and the movement of shares [delivery] from the seller to the buyer. This is termed Delivery versus Payment.

Settlement is run everyday on the LuSE at 0900 hours and completed by 1100 hours, the brokers [seller’s side] receive money for all shares sold whilst the buyers receive the shares purchased as book entry credits to their share accounts in the CSD. Brokers are therefore in a position to pass on the money from the sale proceeds, to their clients the same day on T+3 when settlement is run.

TO SELL SHARES
The procedure for selling shares is similar to that for buying shares as described above.

To sell shares you should send an instruction to your broker or custodian bank preferably by fax or by e-mail.

LATEST INFORMATION ON SHARE PRICES – See LuSE website at: http://www.luse.co.zm

The LuSE website gives indicative share prices in Kwacha, US Dollars [or cents] British pounds [or pence] and South African rands [or cents] to assist investors abroad in their investment decisions.

Latest share prices can be obtained by contacting your broker or the LuSE by phone or e-mail.

DIVIDENDS AND OTHER CORPORATED ACTIONS
Quarterly and final dividends, when declared, will be mailed to the address declared by the investor on the client account form.

It is important therefore that the address declared to the LuSE on the share account application form is the same as the address for receipt of dividend payments. All other correspondence [annual reports, AGM notices, EGMs, etc] will be sent to this address.

SUBSCRIPTION TO THE LuSE STOCK NEWS
Investors abroad can subscribe to the LuSE Daily Stock News, Weekly Stock News or the Monthly Newsletter. Details on subscription are available from luse@zamnet.zm.

INVESTOR PROTECTION AND MARKET REGULATION
The LuSE market is designed to operate to current best international standards.

The LuSE Listing Rules have been harmonised with those of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange [JSE]. The Zambian securities market is regulated by the Securities & Exchange Commission [SEC Zambia] under the Securities Act, Chapter 354 of the Laws of Zambia.

The Securities Act is modelled on modern securities legislation as found in the developed economies, and seeks to provide adequate investor protection and the maintenance of a market that is fair, orderly, efficient and transparent.

All players in the Zambian securities market [brokers, broking firms, and even the LuSE] are licensed by the SEC Zambia.

If investors have any complaint or concern, they should contact the Director of Licensing at the SEC Zambia on e-mail: sec@zamnet.zm or telephone number 260 1 227012/226911 or fax number 260 1 225443. The SEC Zambia will investigate the matter to give appropriate redress and remedial action.

First issued on 18 July 2000

For further details, contact the LuSE CSD Manager on e-mail: info@luse.co.zm or Telephone number 260 1 228594/228391 or fax number 260 1 225969

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