health issues


The FDA received numerous media inquires about a recently published paper (Pooled analysis of two case–control studies on use of cellular and cordless telephones and the risk for malignant brain tumors diagnosed in 1997–2003by Hardell et al.) reporting increased risk of malignant brain tumor associated with long term use ( >10 years) of cell phones and cordless phones. This is not a new study but is an analysis of two studies previously published in 2003 and 2005. Both studies were population based case control studies. Cases were recruited based on histopathological diagnoses submitted to regional cancer registries in Uppsala/Örebro and Linköping regions of Sweden. Control subjects were taken from a population registry covering the whole population in Sweden.

Several studies have been recently published on the risk of long term cell phone use (> 10 years) and brain cancer1. The results reported by Hardell et al. are not in agreement with results obtained in other long term studies. Also, the use of mailed questionnaire for exposure assessment and lack of adjustments for possible confounding factors makes the Hardell et al. study design significantly different from other studies. These facts along with the lack of an established mechanism of action and absence of supporting animal data make it difficult to interpret Hardell et al. findings.

The FDA continues to monitor studies looking at possible health effects resulting from exposure to radio frequency energy. In 1999, FDA signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Cellular Telecommunication & Internet Association (CTIA)2. As called for by this CRADA , FDA plans to convene a meeting in the near future to evaluate all completed, ongoing and planned research looking at health effects associated with the use of wireless communication devices and identify knowledge gaps that may warrant additional research.

First results from national component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of acoustic neurinoma risk in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Danish part of INTERPHONE were published on 27 January 2004 in the American Journal of Epidemiology http://www.aje.oupjournals.org/ Helle Collatz Christensen, Joachim Schüz, Michael Kosteljanetz, Hans Skovgaard Poulsen, Jens Thomsen, and Christoffer Johansen Cellular Telephone Use and Risk of Acoustic Neuroma, Am. J. Epidemiol. 2004 159: 277-283 (http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/reprint/159/3/277.pdf)

The study included 106 cases of incident acoustic neurinoma cases in Denmark diagnosed in 2000-2002 and 212 controls, matched on sex and age. No association was seen between regular mobile phone use and risk of this disease (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6). The average size of tumours was significantly higher, however, for regular users than for non-users (1.66 cm3 vs. 1.39, p=0.03).

Analyses of laterality of phone use indicated significant disagreement between side of use of the phone and the side of the head where the tumour developed. The authors discuss the possibility that hearing loss may be a negative confounder of the association between mobile phone use and acoustic neurinoma risk, as the presence of hearing problems prior to diagnosis may prevent cases from becoming regular users, limit their lifetime calling time and/or force them to switch the side of their head on which they hold the phone when they use.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2004, and the first paper from the International analyses in late 2004 or early 2005.

More information about the Danish study and its results can be found on the site of the Danish Cancer Centre www.cancer.dk. The press release in Danish is available at:
http://www.cancer.dk/cancer/nyheder/aktuelt/ny+undersoegelse+viser+ingen+oeget+kraeftrisiko+ved+mobiltelefoni1.asp

Results from the Swedish acoustic neurinoma component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of acoustic neurinoma risk in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Swedish part of INTERPHONE were published on 13 September 2004 in Epidemiology http://www.epidem.com/ Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Hall, Per; Feychting, Maria; Mobile Phone Use and the Risk of Acoustic Neuroma. Epidemiology 15 (6): 653-659. This article is available at: http://www.epidem.com/.

The study included 148 cases of incident acoustic neurinoma, diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 60 in 1999-2002 in some parts of Sweden and 604 controls, matched on sex, age and residential area. No association was seen, overall, between regular mobile phone use and risk of this disease: the relative risk was estimated to be 1.0 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-1.5). Ten years after the start of mobile phone use, however, the relative risk increased to 1.9 (0.9-4.1). When restricting to tumours on the same side of the head as the phone was normally used (the side of the head where radio-frequency exposure from the phones is expected to be highest), the relative risk increased to 3.9 (1.6-9.5), based on 12 exposed cases.

Acoustic neurinoma are rare tumours, occurring in less than one adult per 100 000 per year. They are slowly growing benign tumours that generally have a good prognosis, as they only rarely undergo malignant change.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of acoustic neurinoma. These results therefore need to be confirmed in other studies before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2004 and in 2005 (the results of the Danish acoustic neurinoma study were published earlier this year: http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/reprint/159/3/277.pdf). The first paper from the International analyses, which will cover over 1000 cases of acoustic neurinoma, should be published in 2005.

More information about the Swedish study and its results can be found on the site of the Karolinska Institute (http://www.imm.ki.se/). The press release in English is available at:
http://www.imm.ki.se/PDF/press%20release%20oct%2013%202004.pdf

Results of the Danish brain tumour component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Danish part of INTERPHONE were published on 12 April 2005 in Neurology http://www.neurology.org/: Collatz Christensen H., Schüz J, Kosteljanetz M, Skovgaard Poulsen H, Boice JD, McLaughlin JK and Johansen C. Cellular telephones and risk for brain tumors: a population-based, incident case-control study. Neurology 64: 1189-1195. The study included 252 incident glioma cases, 175 incident meningioma cases and 822 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age and gender. The cases were aged 20 to 69 and diagnosed in 2000-2002 in the whole of Denmark. Participation rates were 71% for glioma, 74% for meningioma and 64% for controls. Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of low-grade glioma or of meningioma (low-grade glioma OR=1.08, 95% CI 0.58-2.00; meningioma: OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.54-0.1.28). No association was found with time since first exposure (only 6 meningioma and 6 low-grade glioma cases had started using mobile phones 10 years or more before diagnosis, however) or with numbers of call or hours of calls.

A statistically significant reduction in risk was seen for high-grade glioma (OR 0.58, 95%CI 0.37-0.90). The finding is puzzling as there is, a priori, no biological mechanism for such a reduction. It is noted that 18% of the glioma cases could not be interviewed as they had either died or were too ill. Although no information is provided about the grade of the tumours among non-respondents, it is likely that a large proportion of these were high-grade gliomas. In addition, patients with high-grade glioma had significantly lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination than patients with lower-grade glioma or meningioma. The reduced risk for high-grade glioma may therefore reflect selection and/or recall bias.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. These results therefore need to be confirmed in other studies before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2005 and 2006 (The results of the Swedish brain tumour study were published earlier this year http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/content/full/161/6/526/). Results from the International analyses, which will cover about 2800 glioma cases and 2400 meningioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, are expected later in 2005.

More information about the Danish study and its results can be found on the site of the Danish Cancer Centre www.cancer.dk.

Results from the Swedish brain tumour component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Swedish part of INTERPHONE were published on 4 March 2005 in the American Journal of Epidemiology http://aje.oupjournals.org/ : Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Hall, Per; Feychting, Maria and the Swedish Interphone Study Group; Long-Term Mobile Phone Use and Brain Tumor Risk. Am J Epidemiol 161: 1-10.

The study included 371 incident glioma cases, 273 incident meningioma cases and 674 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age, gender and residential area. The cases were aged 20 to 60 and diagnosed in 2000-2002 in parts of Sweden. Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of glioma or of meningioma (glioma OR=0.8, 95% CI 0.6-1.0; meningioma: OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9). Similar results were found for more than 10 years’ duration of mobile phone use. No statistically significantly increased risk was seen for ipsilateral tumours or for tumours located in the temporal and parietal lobes of the brain (the areas thought to be most exposed to radiofrequency radiation emitted by mobile phones). The authors conclude that the data do not support the hypothesis that mobile phone use is related to the risk of glioma or of meningioma.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. This is one of only two studies available at present with sizable numbers of subjects who used mobile phones for 10 years or more. Results of further studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2005 and 2006. The first paper from the international analyses, which will cover about 2800 glioma cases and 2400 meningioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published in 2005.

More information about the Swedish study group can be found on the site of the Karolinska Institute.
http://www.imm.ki.se/divisions/epidemiology/index.html
The article is part of a thesis and a press release in English is available at:

http://www.imm.ki.se/PDF/Press/Press%20release%20nov%2025%202004.pdf

Results combined analyses of acoustic neurinoma risk in the Northern European centres included in INTERPHONE

The results of combined analyses of risk of acoustic neurinoma in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Northern European countries included in the INTERPHONE Study were published online on 30 August 2005 in the British Journal of Cancer
http://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/index.html:
Schoemaker MJ, Swerdlow AJ, Ahlbom A, Auvinen A, Blaasaas KG, Cardis E, Collatz Christensen H, Feychting M, Hepworth SJ, Johansen C, Klæboe L, Lonn S, McKinney PA, Muir K, Raitanen J, Salminen T, Thomsen J, Tynes T. Mobile phone use and risk of acoustic neuroma: results of the Interphone case-control study in five North European countries. British Journal of Cancer – on-line 30 August 2005.

The analyses included 678 acoustic neurinoma cases and 3,553 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age, gender and residential area from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and the UK. The subjects included in the previously published Danish and Swedish analyses (Christensen et al, 2004 and Lönn et al, 2005) were included in these analyses.

Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of neurinoma in this pooled data set (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.7-1.1). There was no association of risk with duration of use, lifetime cumulative hours of use or number of calls, for phone use overall or for analogue or digital phones separately. Risk of a tumour on the same side of the head as reported phone use was raised for use for 10 years or longer (OR=1.8, 95% CI: 1.1–3.1). The authors conclude that there is no substantial risk of this tumour in the first 10 years after starting mobile phone use. However, an increased risk after longer term use could not be ruled out.

Acoustic neurinoma are rare tumours, occurring in less than one adult per 100 000 per year. They are slowly growing benign tumours that generally have a good prognosis, as they only rarely undergo malignant change.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. This paper presents the results of analyses based on the largest number of acoustic neurinomas to date, from European countries where mobile phones were introduced particularly early. The study included 47 cases who had started mobile phone use 10 years or more in the past.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2005 and 2006. The first paper from the international analyses, which will cover about 1100 neurinoma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published shortly.

More information about the analyses can be found on the site of the Institute for Cancer Research, which coordinated these analyses: www.icr.ac.uk

References cited

Collatz Christensen, Helle; Schüz, Joachiml; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Skovgaard Poulsen, Hans; Thomsen Jens and Johansen, Christoffer. Cellular Telephone Use and Risk of Acoustic Neuroma, Am. J. Epidemiol. 2004 159: 277-283

Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Hall, Per; Feychting, Maria. Mobile Phone Use and the Risk of Acoustic Neuroma. Epidemiology 2005 15 (6): 653-659.

Results from the UK brain tumour (glioma) component of the INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the British part of INTERPHONE were published on 19 January 2006 in the British Medical Journal http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/onlinefirst_date.shtml: Hepworth J, Schoemaker MJ, Muir KR, Swerdlow AJ, van Tongeren MJA, McKinney PA. Mobile phone use and risk of glioma in adults: case-control study. BMJ Online First bmj.com

The study included 966 incident glioma cases and 1716 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age, gender and residential area. The cases were aged 20 to 60 and diagnosed in 2000-2004 in five areas of the UK. Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of glioma (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.13). There was no relation for risk of glioma and time since first use, lifetime years of use, and cumulative number of calls and hours of use. A significant excess risk was found for reported phone use ipsilateral to the tumour (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.52); however, a significant reduction in risk was seen (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.93) for contralateral use: recall bias was postulated, as the explanation for this finding.

The authors conclude that, consistent with results of most published studies, use of a mobile phone, either in the short or medium term, is not associated with an increased risk of glioma.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. This is the largest study of brain cancer in relation to mobile telephones to date, with 66 cases who had started use 10 years or more previously. Results of further studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2006. The first paper from the international analyses, which will cover about 2800 glioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published in 2006.
Results from the German brain tumour (glioma and meningioma) component of the INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the German part of INTERPHONE were published in the advance online access edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology, 27 January 2006
http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/papbyrecent.dtl: Joachim Schüz, Eva Böhler, Gabriele Berg, Brigitte Schlehofer, Iris Hettinger, Klaus Schlaefer, Jürgen Wahrendorf, Katharina Kunna-Grass, and Maria Blettner. Cellular Phones, Cordless Phones, and the Risks of Glioma and Meningioma (Interphone Study Group, Germany).

The study included 366 incident glioma cases, 381 meningioma cases, and 1494 randomly selected population based controls matched on gender, age, and study centre. The cases were aged 30 to 69 and diagnosed between 2000 and 2003 in three areas of Germany (Mainz, Bielefeld and Heidelberg). Overall, regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of glioma (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.29) or meningioma (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.13). Amongst persons who had used a mobile phone for at least ten years, however, the relative risk increased to 2.20 (95% CI 0.94 to 5.11) for glioma, while no increase was observed for meningioma. There was no difference between users and non-users in risk of either glioma or meningioma in the lobe of the brain thought to receive the highest exposure to radiofrequency radiation from mobile phones (the temporal lobe).

The authors conclude that, consistent with results of most published studies, overall use of mobile phones is not associated with an increased risk of brain tumour. However, the elevated risk of glioma in long-term users needs to be confirmed in further studies.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. The German study included only 12 cases of glioma who had used phones for 10 years or more. Results of further studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

The first paper from the combined analyses from 13 INTERPHONE countries, which will cover about 2800 glioma and 2400 meningioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published in 2006.

Research Cooperation with the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association (CTIA)

FDA and the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association (CTIA) have a formal Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to do research on wireless phone safety. FDA provides the scientific oversight, obtaining input from experts in government, industry, and academic organizations. CTIA-funded research is conducted through contracts to independent investigators. The initial research will include both laboratory studies and studies of wireless phone users. The CRADA will also include a broad assessment of additional research needs in the context of the latest research developments around the world.

General Information About the CRADA

FDA Recommendations Concerning Research to be Conducted Under the CRADA

FDA has recommended CTIA fund research to address questions raised by previous studies on the effect of radio frequency exposure on micronucleus formation. The specific questions of interest to FDA are:

  • Is the reported effect of RF exposure on lymphocytes accurate and reproducible?
  • What is the role of temperature change in the observed results with RF exposure?
  • Do In Vivo RF exposures increase micronucleous formation?

CTIA followed FDA’s recommendation and funded two In Vitro studies and one In Vivo study:

  • Integrated Laboratory Systems, Research Triangle Park, NC. (In Vitro).
  • Interuniversity Center on Interaction Between Electromagnetic Fields and Biosystems, Naples and Rome, Italy. (In Vitro).
  • The Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Aerosol Research, Hannover, Germany. (In Vivo).

The studies funded by CTIA satisfactorily address the research needs identified by FDA. FDA continues to monitor the progress of these studies through a regular series of progress reports and site visits.

Micronucleus Formation

  • Federal Register Notice for a Meeting (August, 2000) Text
  • Meeting Transcript, Day One WORD or PDF (note: file is 229 pages/339KB)
  • Meeting Transcript, Day Two WORD or PDF (note: file is 99 pages/148KB)
  • FDA Research Recommendations Text

Epidemiology (Studies of Human Populations)

  • Federal Register Notice for a Meeting (April, 2001) Text
  • Meeting Transcript, Day One WORD or PDF (note: file is 297 pages/357KB)
  • Meeting Transcript, Day Two WORD or PDF (note: file is 87 pages/131KB)
  • Federal Register Notice for a Meeting (May, 2001) Text
  • Meeting Transcript, Day One WORD or PDF (note: file is 599 pages/577KB)
  • Meeting Transcript, Day Two WORD or PDF (note: file is 281 pages/285KB)
  • FDA Research Recommendations WORD, PDF or Text

Baby born with 2 faces in India, diagnosed with craniofacial duplication

This baby -- with two faces, two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes -- was born about 30 miles east of New Delhi, India. She is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess.

This baby — with two faces, two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes — was born about 30 miles east of New Delhi, India. She is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess. (AP PHOTO BY GURINDER OSAN)  Click here to find out more!

SAINI SUNPURA, India – A baby with two faces was born in a northern Indian village, where she is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess, her father said Tuesday.

The baby, Lali, apparently has an extremely rare condition known as craniofacial duplication, where a single head has two faces. All of Lali’s facial features are duplicated except for her ears–she has two. Otherwise, she has two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes.

“My daughter is fine–like any other child,” said Vinod Singh, 23, a poor farm worker.

Lali has caused a sensation in the dusty village of Saini Sunpura, 25 miles east of New Delhi. When she left the hospital, eight hours after a normal delivery on March 11, she was swarmed by villagers, said Sabir Ali, the director of Saifi Hospital.

“She drinks milk from her two mouths and opens and shuts all the four eyes at one time,” Ali said.

Rural India is deeply superstitious and the little girl is being hailed as a return of the Hindu goddess of valor, Durga, a fiery deity traditionally depicted with three eyes and many arms.

Up to 100 people have been visiting Lali at her home every day to touch her feet out of respect, offer money and receive blessings, Singh told The Associated Press.

“She is the reincarnation of a goddess,” said Lakhi Chand, a 65-year-old farmer who came to see Lali from neighboring Haryana state.

“Lali is God’s gift to us,” said Jaipal Singh, a member of the local village council. “She has brought fame to our village.”

Village chief Daulat Ram said he planned to build a temple to Durga in the village.

“I am writing to the state government to provide money to build the temple and help the parents look after their daughter,” Ram said.

Lali’s condition is often linked to serious health complications, but the doctor said she was doing well.

“She is leading a normal life with no breathing difficulties,” said Ali, adding that he saw no need for surgery.

Lali’s parents were married in February 2007. Lali is their first child.

Singh said he took his daughter to a hospital in New Delhi where doctors suggested a CT scan to determine whether her internal organs were normal, but Singh said he felt it was unnecessary.

“I don’t feel the need of that at this stage as my daughter is behaving like a normal child, posing no problems,” he said.

 

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Posted by Belliah K Theise

I read this in one of the latest magazines, and thought of sharing it to women like me who regularly use lipstick like myself.

According to the investigative report , “New evidence confirms that even low levels of lead pose serious risks to women’s health. Lead is a neurotoxin that accumulated in the body, so exposure to small amounts can create overload that results in fatigue, nervousness and depression,” reports Carolyn Dean, M.D, ND.

According to the report, “a recent investigation by the campaign for safe Cosmetics (CSC) revealed that among 33 lipsticks tested, one third exceeds the FDA’s limit for lead in candy.” The report continued to state that, this fact has some expert urging caution because the average woman inadvertently swallows 4 to 6 pounds of lipstick in life time.

What you should do:

Sidestep overload risk with extra calcium that can sop up lead. In one study, women who supplemented with the Calcium for six months lowered their blood levels of the lead by 16 percent. Garlic and Cilantro have shown to halt the cycle in studies that were conducted by Jordan University of science & Technology.

From my home library to yours.

Belliah K Theise

 

 

 

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b6_edited.jpegthandiwe.jpgclassy-daddy-3.jpgone-zambia-one-nation.jpg

In every country there is rich and poor. For those who never experienced poverty in their up bringing, poverty is a tale. We hope politicians that are out to make change in the society should remember the legacy  to bring change. Zambian chronicle is here for change. Some clips below are here to show how important every child is. No matter, which environment or place they are being raised in. Poverty will never stop them, they dance, they play drums with their inborn skills and talent. 

Most of us at Zambian chronicle grew up with no resources, limited education system, walked to school, no lunch packs. That did not stop us, we made it, and grew up with hearts to reach out to other people with our limited resources. our legacy is to help kids( boys and girls) and women, By bringing out the positive side of this world. 

We expect Zambian presidential candidates to focus on  important issues like education, to help the future generation to be better leaders and reach their dreams.

 

Zambian Chronicle’s legacy:- Next Zambian President should bring hope to the future generation. Please all Zambian leaders should address the problems below:

v=8c1ByH_oMz4&feature=related]

Tribal Zambian Party

Zambian kids dancing

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

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(CNN) — U.S. health officials said Wednesday they have found a contaminant in a blood-thinning drug produced by Baxter Healthcare Corp. that has been linked to more than a dozen deaths in the United States.

art.blood.gi.jpg

The drug can keep potentially life-threatening blood clots from forming in the veins, arteries, and lungs.

In early February, the Food and Drug Administration launched an investigation and then a recall of some forms of the product.

The scrutiny began after a spike in reports of health problems associated with heparin, a drug made by Baxter from pig intestines at plants in China and Wisconsin.

Though the cause of the problems has not been determined, FDA investigators found “a heparin-like compound — that is not heparin — present in some of the active pharmaceutical ingredients” in both facilities, said Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

The contaminant, which made up 5 percent to 20 percent of each sample tested, “reacts like heparin in some of the conventional tests used for heparin,” which explains why it was not picked up, she told reporters in a conference call.

No causal link between the contaminant and the adverse events has been established yet, Woodcock said.

She added that it was not clear whether the contaminant was added accidentally, as part of the processing or deliberately.

It also was not clear whether the contaminant was introduced in the company’s plant in Wisconsin or the one in China, Woodcock said.

Though she said the exact structure of the contaminant has not been identified, “it is similar to heparin glycans.” Glycans are polysaccharides, a complex class of carbohydrate.

She added it was unclear whether other heparin products used outside the United States might also contain the product.

Later this week, the agency will release recommendations on how manufacturers and regulators can screen for the contaminant, she said.

Last year, pet food made in China was found to be tainted with an ingredient that replaced more expensive protein and that initial tests did not identify as a contaminant. Asked if the heparin contamination could be a similar case, Woodcock said, “It’s possible.”

Doctors have used the blood-thinner for 60 years with “no history of any problems whatsoever,” said the FDA commissioner, Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach.

Its intravenous use can keep potentially life-threatening blood clots from forming in the veins, arteries and lungs.

Von Eschenbach said it would be “disingenuous” to expect the agency would be able to inspect “every institution in every case.”

Over the last fiscal year, the agency reported having inspected more than 1,000 foreign plants, a record.

Since the agency issued its report that 19 deaths had been linked to the drug since January 1, 2007, it has received word of another 27 deaths, “but many of those do not fit our definition of this type of event,” Woodcock said.

In all, the FDA has received 785 heparin-linked reports of adverse events — including difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, excessive sweating and plummeting blood pressure that can lead to life-threatening shock.

“They’re continuing to come in fairly rapidly because there has been a lot of reporting of this,” she said.

In a written statement, Baxter said its tests have suggested “that the root cause may be associated with the crude heparin, sourced from China, or from the subsequent processing of that product before it reaches Baxter.”

Meanwhile, Scientific Protein Laboratories LLC, which supplies the company with the active pharmaceutical ingredients, issued a statement saying it is working with the FDA, Baxter and outside experts to identify the cause of the adverse events.

“Thus far, no conclusions have been reached about the root cause,” it said.

“It is premature to conclude that the heparin active pharmaceutical ingredient sourced from China and provided by SPL to Baxter is responsible for these adverse events.”

It said that its voluntary recall of suspect product was being made as a precaution. 

CNN

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b6_edited.jpegBy Belliah K Theise

This week ‘s men topic is on Potbelly. How do you like your gut? Some women like men with guts and some do not. The question to ask yourself other than attraction is, Do you feel health with your big potbelly?  

More on Mens Page…….

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By Belliah K Theise

March 02 2008

In Africa Zambia Aloe Vera plant is used for burns, and in some cases has proved to speed up the healing of minor burns. The liquid from aloe Vera leaf is applied on burns.

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Here is what Dr Daniel Lozano M.D of Lehigh Valley Hospital Network Says:

“The Most Important thing is to stop the burning process by running cool water over the Injury” Says Burn surgeon Daniel Lozano M.D of Lehigh Valley and Health Network” 

Clean and dry the area, then cover it.  

 Depending on the size, depth and location of the burn, you may need a professional care. Get to a hospital with a specialized burn center if it covers an entire body. For those in areas that have hospitals.

The degree is another factor. First and smaller second-degree burns can be treated at home. “Use an over- the counter antibiotic cream like Neosporin to keep the burn moist,” Lozano says. 

First Aid Guide lines for burns

1. If you witness someone on fire, get him to “stop, drop and roll” Once frames are out, cool the burns with water, and then remove burned clothes. “You’ll also want to remove jewelry or boots before swelling occurs,” Dr Lozano says.

2. if it is chemical burn, flush the site with cool water for 20-30 minutes.

3. If you suspect an electrical burn, see if a victim is still in contact with the electrical source. If so, use a stick, card-board or item made of plastic to move the live wire away from the victim and call for help. If you cant tell call for help do not touch the victim as you do not want to get shocked too.

4. the larger or deeper the burn, the more likely the victim may go into shock. Lay him down with his head slightly lower than his shoulders and elevate his legs.

5. Stay away from home remedies. “Using butter, oil, toothpaste or an aloe plant can lead to infection” Lozano saysAlso do not use ice on large burns. It lowers the body temperature and can cause shock or damage the skin.

Thanks a trillionb6_edited.jpeg

Belliah K Theise

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By Belliah K Theise

March 01 2008

“Not everyone should eat the same thing or do the same excercise. What food we absorb well and how our bodies handle stress differ with each blood type.” Says Dr Peter D’Adamo.

According to Dr Peter, He explains which foods,spices,teas and condiments help someone of your blood type maintain optimal health and idea weight. In additions,one need to know which vitamins and suppliments to take or to avoid.

What is your blood type?

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

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Headlines (Scroll down for complete stories):
1. Five Ways to Love Your Heart
2. Religion May Cut Anxiety
3. Self-Initiated Medical Tests: Good or Bad?
4. Good Bacteria in Women Help Slow HIV Transmission
5. Heredity a Factor in Dying From Flu


1. Five Ways to Love Your Heart

Lori Daniels, M.D., cardiologist at the University of California, San Diego Medical Center offers cardiac patients five easy ways to love their hearts throughout the year.

1) Sunday Night, Count Them Out

Instead of managing multiple pill bottles, manage one pill box. Almost every pharmacy sells pill boxes marked with the days of the week. Variations are offered with multiple compartments if you are taking more than one prescription. Every Sunday night, at a designated time, fill up one weeks worth of pills. Reduce the time you spend counting your prescriptions to four times a month instead of thirty.

2) One Crème Brulee = Five Miles

Research shows a direct link between obesity and increased cardiovascular disease. One way to keep your weight down is to reduce the number of calories you intake and increase the number of calories you burn. So before diving into a crème brulee or double chocolate sundae, find out how many calories the dessert contains. Then determine how many miles you would need to walk to burn the calories off. On average, 100 calories are burned walking one mile. Is one dessert worth a three mile trek? You decide.

3) Do Not Hesitate to Laminate

Keep an up-to-date list of medications and physician contact info in your bag and car glove compartment. In a time of emergency, this will serve as a quick and easy reference for family and medical personnel. Be sure to share this list with friends and family before traveling in case you need to fill a prescription or get medical attention while overseas.

4) One Aspirin, Crushed

Keep a supply of aspirin handy. If you have heart disease you should be taking some form of aspirin every day at any time you choose. If you or a companion believes you are suffering the onset of a heart attack, take either one adult or two baby aspirin. Instead of swallowing the pill whole, crush it first so that the aspirin is more rapidly absorbed into your body.

5) Avoid Salt of All Colors

You may be able to significantly lower your blood pressure by reducing the sodium in your diet. Be aware that white table salt is just one form of sodium in your kitchen. Other culinary culprits with high sodium content come in black (soy and teriyaki sauce), yellow (mustard), pink (lunch meats) and brown (canned soups and gravies.) Check the sodium content before ingesting a processed product; if you dramatically reduce your intake of sodium, you might, under your doctor’s care, be able to eliminate some blood pressure medications.

Editor’s Note:


2. Religion May Cut Anxiety

For many, religious activity changes between childhood and adulthood, and a new study finds this could affect one’s mental health. ?

According to Temple University’s Joanna Maselko, Sc.D., women who had stopped being religiously active were more than three times more likely to have suffered generalized anxiety and alcohol abuse/dependence than women who reported always having been active.

“One’s lifetime pattern of religious service attendance can be related to psychiatric illness,” said Maselko, an assistant professor of public health and co-author of the study, which appears in the January issue of Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

Conversely, men who stopped being religiously active were less likely to suffer major depression when compared to men who had always been religiously active.

Maselko offers one possible explanation for the gender differences in the relationship between religious activity and mental health.

“Women are simply more integrated into the social networks of their religious communities. When they stop attending religious services, they lose access to that network and all its potential benefits. Men may not be as integrated into the religious community in the first place and so may not suffer the negative consequences of leaving,” Maselko said.

The study expands on previous research in the field by analyzing the relationship between mental health — anxiety, depression and alcohol dependence or abuse — and spirituality using current and past levels, said Maselko, who conducted the research when she was at Harvard University.

In the study sample, comprising 718 adults, a majority of men and women changed their level of religious activity between childhood and adulthood, which was critical information for the researchers.

“A person’s current level of spirituality is only part of the story. We can only get a better understanding of the relationship between health and spirituality by knowing a person’s lifetime religious history,” Maselko said.

Out of the 278 women in the group, 39 percent (N=109) had always been religiously active and 51 percent (N=141) had not been active since childhood. About 7 percent of the women who have always been religiously active met the criteria for generalized anxiety disorder compared to 21 percent of women who had stopped being religiously active.

“Everyone has some spirituality, whether it is an active part of their life or not; whether they are agnostic or atheist or just ‘non-practicing.’ These choices potentially have health implications, similar to the way that one’s social networks do,” Maselko said.

Editor’s Note:


3. Self-Initiated Medical Tests: Good or Bad?

Is it a good or bad thing when people decide or their own — and without consulting a physician — to have medical tests such as CT scans and X-rays performed? Such tests are supposed to offer “peace of mind” to people, and to assure them they are in good health. The tests are touted in newspaper and radio ads with pitches such as, “Why wait for symptoms to occur?’ They’re billed as a “high-tech medical check-up” and usually cost about $1,000 for a whole body scan, with the person being scanned paying for it out of pocket since most insurance companies don’t cover such tests.

In the United States, self-initiated tests have yet to be performed on a large enough scale to bring the question to public attention, but more and more companies are advertising and offering such screening services. In the United Kingdom, which has a national health service, the question has already being asked and the government is preparing to issue a cautionary report saying screening healthy people does not deliver better public health.

A leading British specialist in preventive medicine, Professor Nicholas Wald, says that scans and blood tests performed by private health companies are useless at best and dangerous at worst. Wald says that such tests often find benign abnormalities while missing genuine problems, and that radiation from scanners may actually increase cancer risk. He further believes such tests “always cause anxiety” while charging people for tests of questionable value, such as heart scans and “virtual” colonoscopies.

Radiologist John Giles, the clinical director of a UK company that provides private scans and tests, disagrees with Wald, saying, “This is targeted screening which gives very clear results and is unlikely to cause unnecessary worry. You can’t have a one-size-fits-all policy: some people don’t want to know, some people do. Screening is a personal decision and people are fed up with this paternalistic approach which tells them they can’t make choices for themselves.”

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4. “Good” Bacteria in Women Help Slow HIV Transmission

Beneficial bacteria found in healthy women help to reduce the amount of vaginal HIV among HIV-infected women and might make it more difficult for the virus to spread, boosting the possibility that “good bacteria” might someday be tapped in the fight against HIV.

The findings come from physicians and scientists at the University of Washington and the University of Rochester Medical Center, who worked together in an effort to learn more about how HIV survives and spreads from person to person. The study involving 57 women was done in Seattle and Rochester through the Women’s HIV Interdisciplinary Network (WHIN), which is based at the University of Washington.

The team studied the vaginal environment, examining the mix of bacteria that reside there and taking into account several other factors. Physicians tracked the level of HIV virus in the vagina as well as infection by common sexually transmitted diseases like trichomoniasis, gonorrhea and chlamydia, and other more common types of vaginal infections.

Physicians also monitored the levels of beneficial bacteria known as Lactobacillus in the vagina, as well as hydrogen peroxide, which is produced by the bacteria and hinders the virus. They also measured the level of HIV in the women’s blood and the rate of progression of the disease overall.

The team found that women with hydrogen-peroxide-producing Lactobacillus in the vagina had lower levels of HIV virus in genital secretions – what physicians call the genital viral load. Physicians know that the lower the level of HIV in the sexual tract, the less likely that the virus will be spread from person to person through sexual contact.

Scientists have previously recognized from laboratory studies that Lactobacillus might give women some natural protection against HIV. The bacteria, commonly found in most women, bind to the virus and secrete hydrogen peroxide. The bacteria are a close cousin of the Lactobacillus bacteria found in the small intestine, a type of “good” bacteria widely found in yogurt.

While previous work in the laboratory has indicated that Lactobacillus might help prevent HIV infection in women, the current study actually links, in women, decreased levels of the virus in the vagina with the presence of Lactobacillus that produce hydrogen peroxide there.

The team also found that the amount of the virus in the vagina varied in step with the presence of Lactobacillus: Women who did not have the bacteria at first but who had acquired it by a subsequent visit had their vaginal HIV levels drop, while vaginal HIV levels increased in women in whom the good bacteria had disappeared between visits.

The research was presented this week at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston by Jane Hitti, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Hitti has been working closely with Robert Coombs, M.D., Ph.D., the principal investigator for the WHIN study and professor of Laboratory Medicine and of Medicine at the University of Washington. Amneris Luque, M.D., associate professor of Medicine and medical director of the AIDS Center at Strong Memorial Hospital, and Susan Cohn, M.D., associate professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, also took part in the study.

“These findings underscore the importance of maintaining a healthy, Lactobacillus-dominant vaginal flora for HIV-positive women,” said Hitti. “I hope that we can explore Lactobacillus replacement in the future for women who do not have this bacteria, as a strategy to decrease the amount of HIV in the vagina.”

“The research opens up some doors,” said Luque. “Sexual activity is the most common mode of transmission of HIV. Perhaps we can make it less likely to spread by somehow taking advantage of good bacteria as a natural way to stop HIV and prevent transmission. These findings are striking, though preliminary, and should be looked at further.”

Luque and Cohn both care for patients at Strong’s AIDS clinic, which provides ongoing care for approximately 900 patients with HIV. The center is part of a broader AIDS treatment and research effort at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The University is the only institution in the nation to be part, since inception, of two major national AIDS research efforts – the search for a vaccine, and the testing of new treatments. More than 3,000 Rochester-area residents have taken part in treatment and vaccine studies at the University’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Unit, funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Cohn stresses the importance of HIV-positive women participating in clinical research. “These women made a large contribution to knowledge about HIV and reproductive health by participating in this study. Advances in the care of HIV-positive women really depend on the dedication of study subjects.”

Editor’s Note:


5. Heredity a Factor in Dying from Flu

People may inherit a genetic predisposition to dying from influenza virus infection, according to an analysis of genealogy records linked to death certificates in Utah over a period of 100 years.

“A heritable contribution to the development of severe influenza virus infection (i.e., that which results in death) has not previously been hypothesized or tested,” Dr. Frederick S. Albright of the University of Utah College of Pharmacy and colleagues point out in a report in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

Using the comprehensive Utah database, Albright and colleagues estimated the relative risks of death due to influenza for the relatives of 4855 individuals who died of influenza in the past 100 years.

They found that both close and distant relatives of individuals who died of the flu had a significantly increased risk of also dying of flu, “consistent with a combination of shared exposure and genetic effects.”

All “first-degree” relatives (parents, sisters, brothers) of individuals who died of influenza had a 54 percent higher risk of dying from influenza. The risk was 74 percent higher in siblings, 37 percent higher in parents, and 59 percent higher in children.

The risk of death from influenza in second-degree relatives of individuals who died of influenza was 22 percent and in more distant third-degree relatives it was 16 percent higher.

This genetic predisposition seems to be independent of the strain of influenza and the age of the individual.

The findings, the researchers say, support the need to study at-risk individuals and families to identify the genes involved. “Identification of the genes responsible could lead to new developments in treatment and prevention during epidemics,” Dr. Lisa Cannon-Albright, who was involved in the research, told Reuters Health.

Copyright Reuters

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