Health & Lifestyle


The FDA received numerous media inquires about a recently published paper (Pooled analysis of two case–control studies on use of cellular and cordless telephones and the risk for malignant brain tumors diagnosed in 1997–2003by Hardell et al.) reporting increased risk of malignant brain tumor associated with long term use ( >10 years) of cell phones and cordless phones. This is not a new study but is an analysis of two studies previously published in 2003 and 2005. Both studies were population based case control studies. Cases were recruited based on histopathological diagnoses submitted to regional cancer registries in Uppsala/Örebro and Linköping regions of Sweden. Control subjects were taken from a population registry covering the whole population in Sweden.

Several studies have been recently published on the risk of long term cell phone use (> 10 years) and brain cancer1. The results reported by Hardell et al. are not in agreement with results obtained in other long term studies. Also, the use of mailed questionnaire for exposure assessment and lack of adjustments for possible confounding factors makes the Hardell et al. study design significantly different from other studies. These facts along with the lack of an established mechanism of action and absence of supporting animal data make it difficult to interpret Hardell et al. findings.

The FDA continues to monitor studies looking at possible health effects resulting from exposure to radio frequency energy. In 1999, FDA signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Cellular Telecommunication & Internet Association (CTIA)2. As called for by this CRADA , FDA plans to convene a meeting in the near future to evaluate all completed, ongoing and planned research looking at health effects associated with the use of wireless communication devices and identify knowledge gaps that may warrant additional research.

First results from national component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of acoustic neurinoma risk in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Danish part of INTERPHONE were published on 27 January 2004 in the American Journal of Epidemiology http://www.aje.oupjournals.org/ Helle Collatz Christensen, Joachim Schüz, Michael Kosteljanetz, Hans Skovgaard Poulsen, Jens Thomsen, and Christoffer Johansen Cellular Telephone Use and Risk of Acoustic Neuroma, Am. J. Epidemiol. 2004 159: 277-283 (http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/reprint/159/3/277.pdf)

The study included 106 cases of incident acoustic neurinoma cases in Denmark diagnosed in 2000-2002 and 212 controls, matched on sex and age. No association was seen between regular mobile phone use and risk of this disease (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.5-1.6). The average size of tumours was significantly higher, however, for regular users than for non-users (1.66 cm3 vs. 1.39, p=0.03).

Analyses of laterality of phone use indicated significant disagreement between side of use of the phone and the side of the head where the tumour developed. The authors discuss the possibility that hearing loss may be a negative confounder of the association between mobile phone use and acoustic neurinoma risk, as the presence of hearing problems prior to diagnosis may prevent cases from becoming regular users, limit their lifetime calling time and/or force them to switch the side of their head on which they hold the phone when they use.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2004, and the first paper from the International analyses in late 2004 or early 2005.

More information about the Danish study and its results can be found on the site of the Danish Cancer Centre www.cancer.dk. The press release in Danish is available at:
http://www.cancer.dk/cancer/nyheder/aktuelt/ny+undersoegelse+viser+ingen+oeget+kraeftrisiko+ved+mobiltelefoni1.asp

Results from the Swedish acoustic neurinoma component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of acoustic neurinoma risk in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Swedish part of INTERPHONE were published on 13 September 2004 in Epidemiology http://www.epidem.com/ Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Hall, Per; Feychting, Maria; Mobile Phone Use and the Risk of Acoustic Neuroma. Epidemiology 15 (6): 653-659. This article is available at: http://www.epidem.com/.

The study included 148 cases of incident acoustic neurinoma, diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 60 in 1999-2002 in some parts of Sweden and 604 controls, matched on sex, age and residential area. No association was seen, overall, between regular mobile phone use and risk of this disease: the relative risk was estimated to be 1.0 (95% confidence interval = 0.6-1.5). Ten years after the start of mobile phone use, however, the relative risk increased to 1.9 (0.9-4.1). When restricting to tumours on the same side of the head as the phone was normally used (the side of the head where radio-frequency exposure from the phones is expected to be highest), the relative risk increased to 3.9 (1.6-9.5), based on 12 exposed cases.

Acoustic neurinoma are rare tumours, occurring in less than one adult per 100 000 per year. They are slowly growing benign tumours that generally have a good prognosis, as they only rarely undergo malignant change.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of acoustic neurinoma. These results therefore need to be confirmed in other studies before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2004 and in 2005 (the results of the Danish acoustic neurinoma study were published earlier this year: http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/reprint/159/3/277.pdf). The first paper from the International analyses, which will cover over 1000 cases of acoustic neurinoma, should be published in 2005.

More information about the Swedish study and its results can be found on the site of the Karolinska Institute (http://www.imm.ki.se/). The press release in English is available at:
http://www.imm.ki.se/PDF/press%20release%20oct%2013%202004.pdf

Results of the Danish brain tumour component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Danish part of INTERPHONE were published on 12 April 2005 in Neurology http://www.neurology.org/: Collatz Christensen H., Schüz J, Kosteljanetz M, Skovgaard Poulsen H, Boice JD, McLaughlin JK and Johansen C. Cellular telephones and risk for brain tumors: a population-based, incident case-control study. Neurology 64: 1189-1195. The study included 252 incident glioma cases, 175 incident meningioma cases and 822 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age and gender. The cases were aged 20 to 69 and diagnosed in 2000-2002 in the whole of Denmark. Participation rates were 71% for glioma, 74% for meningioma and 64% for controls. Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of low-grade glioma or of meningioma (low-grade glioma OR=1.08, 95% CI 0.58-2.00; meningioma: OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.54-0.1.28). No association was found with time since first exposure (only 6 meningioma and 6 low-grade glioma cases had started using mobile phones 10 years or more before diagnosis, however) or with numbers of call or hours of calls.

A statistically significant reduction in risk was seen for high-grade glioma (OR 0.58, 95%CI 0.37-0.90). The finding is puzzling as there is, a priori, no biological mechanism for such a reduction. It is noted that 18% of the glioma cases could not be interviewed as they had either died or were too ill. Although no information is provided about the grade of the tumours among non-respondents, it is likely that a large proportion of these were high-grade gliomas. In addition, patients with high-grade glioma had significantly lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination than patients with lower-grade glioma or meningioma. The reduced risk for high-grade glioma may therefore reflect selection and/or recall bias.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. These results therefore need to be confirmed in other studies before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2005 and 2006 (The results of the Swedish brain tumour study were published earlier this year http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/content/full/161/6/526/). Results from the International analyses, which will cover about 2800 glioma cases and 2400 meningioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, are expected later in 2005.

More information about the Danish study and its results can be found on the site of the Danish Cancer Centre www.cancer.dk.

Results from the Swedish brain tumour component of INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Swedish part of INTERPHONE were published on 4 March 2005 in the American Journal of Epidemiology http://aje.oupjournals.org/ : Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Hall, Per; Feychting, Maria and the Swedish Interphone Study Group; Long-Term Mobile Phone Use and Brain Tumor Risk. Am J Epidemiol 161: 1-10.

The study included 371 incident glioma cases, 273 incident meningioma cases and 674 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age, gender and residential area. The cases were aged 20 to 60 and diagnosed in 2000-2002 in parts of Sweden. Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of glioma or of meningioma (glioma OR=0.8, 95% CI 0.6-1.0; meningioma: OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9). Similar results were found for more than 10 years’ duration of mobile phone use. No statistically significantly increased risk was seen for ipsilateral tumours or for tumours located in the temporal and parietal lobes of the brain (the areas thought to be most exposed to radiofrequency radiation emitted by mobile phones). The authors conclude that the data do not support the hypothesis that mobile phone use is related to the risk of glioma or of meningioma.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. This is one of only two studies available at present with sizable numbers of subjects who used mobile phones for 10 years or more. Results of further studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2005 and 2006. The first paper from the international analyses, which will cover about 2800 glioma cases and 2400 meningioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published in 2005.

More information about the Swedish study group can be found on the site of the Karolinska Institute.
http://www.imm.ki.se/divisions/epidemiology/index.html
The article is part of a thesis and a press release in English is available at:

http://www.imm.ki.se/PDF/Press/Press%20release%20nov%2025%202004.pdf

Results combined analyses of acoustic neurinoma risk in the Northern European centres included in INTERPHONE

The results of combined analyses of risk of acoustic neurinoma in relation to use of mobile telephones in the Northern European countries included in the INTERPHONE Study were published online on 30 August 2005 in the British Journal of Cancer
http://www.nature.com/bjc/journal/vaop/ncurrent/index.html:
Schoemaker MJ, Swerdlow AJ, Ahlbom A, Auvinen A, Blaasaas KG, Cardis E, Collatz Christensen H, Feychting M, Hepworth SJ, Johansen C, Klæboe L, Lonn S, McKinney PA, Muir K, Raitanen J, Salminen T, Thomsen J, Tynes T. Mobile phone use and risk of acoustic neuroma: results of the Interphone case-control study in five North European countries. British Journal of Cancer – on-line 30 August 2005.

The analyses included 678 acoustic neurinoma cases and 3,553 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age, gender and residential area from Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden and the UK. The subjects included in the previously published Danish and Swedish analyses (Christensen et al, 2004 and Lönn et al, 2005) were included in these analyses.

Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of neurinoma in this pooled data set (OR=0.9, 95% CI 0.7-1.1). There was no association of risk with duration of use, lifetime cumulative hours of use or number of calls, for phone use overall or for analogue or digital phones separately. Risk of a tumour on the same side of the head as reported phone use was raised for use for 10 years or longer (OR=1.8, 95% CI: 1.1–3.1). The authors conclude that there is no substantial risk of this tumour in the first 10 years after starting mobile phone use. However, an increased risk after longer term use could not be ruled out.

Acoustic neurinoma are rare tumours, occurring in less than one adult per 100 000 per year. They are slowly growing benign tumours that generally have a good prognosis, as they only rarely undergo malignant change.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. This paper presents the results of analyses based on the largest number of acoustic neurinomas to date, from European countries where mobile phones were introduced particularly early. The study included 47 cases who had started mobile phone use 10 years or more in the past.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2005 and 2006. The first paper from the international analyses, which will cover about 1100 neurinoma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published shortly.

More information about the analyses can be found on the site of the Institute for Cancer Research, which coordinated these analyses: www.icr.ac.uk

References cited

Collatz Christensen, Helle; Schüz, Joachiml; Kosteljanetz, Michael; Skovgaard Poulsen, Hans; Thomsen Jens and Johansen, Christoffer. Cellular Telephone Use and Risk of Acoustic Neuroma, Am. J. Epidemiol. 2004 159: 277-283

Lönn, Stefan; Ahlbom, Anders; Hall, Per; Feychting, Maria. Mobile Phone Use and the Risk of Acoustic Neuroma. Epidemiology 2005 15 (6): 653-659.

Results from the UK brain tumour (glioma) component of the INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the British part of INTERPHONE were published on 19 January 2006 in the British Medical Journal http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/onlinefirst_date.shtml: Hepworth J, Schoemaker MJ, Muir KR, Swerdlow AJ, van Tongeren MJA, McKinney PA. Mobile phone use and risk of glioma in adults: case-control study. BMJ Online First bmj.com

The study included 966 incident glioma cases and 1716 randomly selected population based controls stratified on age, gender and residential area. The cases were aged 20 to 60 and diagnosed in 2000-2004 in five areas of the UK. Regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of glioma (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.13). There was no relation for risk of glioma and time since first use, lifetime years of use, and cumulative number of calls and hours of use. A significant excess risk was found for reported phone use ipsilateral to the tumour (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.52); however, a significant reduction in risk was seen (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.93) for contralateral use: recall bias was postulated, as the explanation for this finding.

The authors conclude that, consistent with results of most published studies, use of a mobile phone, either in the short or medium term, is not associated with an increased risk of glioma.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. This is the largest study of brain cancer in relation to mobile telephones to date, with 66 cases who had started use 10 years or more previously. Results of further studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

Results of other national components of the INTERPHONE Study should be published later in 2006. The first paper from the international analyses, which will cover about 2800 glioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published in 2006.
Results from the German brain tumour (glioma and meningioma) component of the INTERPHONE Study

The first results of analyses of risk of brain tumour in relation to use of mobile telephones in the German part of INTERPHONE were published in the advance online access edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology, 27 January 2006
http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/papbyrecent.dtl: Joachim Schüz, Eva Böhler, Gabriele Berg, Brigitte Schlehofer, Iris Hettinger, Klaus Schlaefer, Jürgen Wahrendorf, Katharina Kunna-Grass, and Maria Blettner. Cellular Phones, Cordless Phones, and the Risks of Glioma and Meningioma (Interphone Study Group, Germany).

The study included 366 incident glioma cases, 381 meningioma cases, and 1494 randomly selected population based controls matched on gender, age, and study centre. The cases were aged 30 to 69 and diagnosed between 2000 and 2003 in three areas of Germany (Mainz, Bielefeld and Heidelberg). Overall, regular mobile phone use did not increase the risk of glioma (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.29) or meningioma (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.13). Amongst persons who had used a mobile phone for at least ten years, however, the relative risk increased to 2.20 (95% CI 0.94 to 5.11) for glioma, while no increase was observed for meningioma. There was no difference between users and non-users in risk of either glioma or meningioma in the lobe of the brain thought to receive the highest exposure to radiofrequency radiation from mobile phones (the temporal lobe).

The authors conclude that, consistent with results of most published studies, overall use of mobile phones is not associated with an increased risk of brain tumour. However, the elevated risk of glioma in long-term users needs to be confirmed in further studies.

To date, few studies have included sufficient numbers of cases among long-term users to allow a definitive conclusion about the existence or not of a possible association between mobile telephone use and the risk of brain cancer. The German study included only 12 cases of glioma who had used phones for 10 years or more. Results of further studies are needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

The first paper from the combined analyses from 13 INTERPHONE countries, which will cover about 2800 glioma and 2400 meningioma cases and sizable numbers of long-term users, should be published in 2006.

Research Cooperation with the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association (CTIA)

FDA and the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association (CTIA) have a formal Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to do research on wireless phone safety. FDA provides the scientific oversight, obtaining input from experts in government, industry, and academic organizations. CTIA-funded research is conducted through contracts to independent investigators. The initial research will include both laboratory studies and studies of wireless phone users. The CRADA will also include a broad assessment of additional research needs in the context of the latest research developments around the world.

General Information About the CRADA

FDA Recommendations Concerning Research to be Conducted Under the CRADA

FDA has recommended CTIA fund research to address questions raised by previous studies on the effect of radio frequency exposure on micronucleus formation. The specific questions of interest to FDA are:

  • Is the reported effect of RF exposure on lymphocytes accurate and reproducible?
  • What is the role of temperature change in the observed results with RF exposure?
  • Do In Vivo RF exposures increase micronucleous formation?

CTIA followed FDA’s recommendation and funded two In Vitro studies and one In Vivo study:

  • Integrated Laboratory Systems, Research Triangle Park, NC. (In Vitro).
  • Interuniversity Center on Interaction Between Electromagnetic Fields and Biosystems, Naples and Rome, Italy. (In Vitro).
  • The Fraunhofer Institute of Toxicology and Aerosol Research, Hannover, Germany. (In Vivo).

The studies funded by CTIA satisfactorily address the research needs identified by FDA. FDA continues to monitor the progress of these studies through a regular series of progress reports and site visits.

Micronucleus Formation

  • Federal Register Notice for a Meeting (August, 2000) Text
  • Meeting Transcript, Day One WORD or PDF (note: file is 229 pages/339KB)
  • Meeting Transcript, Day Two WORD or PDF (note: file is 99 pages/148KB)
  • FDA Research Recommendations Text

Epidemiology (Studies of Human Populations)

  • Federal Register Notice for a Meeting (April, 2001) Text
  • Meeting Transcript, Day One WORD or PDF (note: file is 297 pages/357KB)
  • Meeting Transcript, Day Two WORD or PDF (note: file is 87 pages/131KB)
  • Federal Register Notice for a Meeting (May, 2001) Text
  • Meeting Transcript, Day One WORD or PDF (note: file is 599 pages/577KB)
  • Meeting Transcript, Day Two WORD or PDF (note: file is 281 pages/285KB)
  • FDA Research Recommendations WORD, PDF or Text

 
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 By Belliah K Theise

11  April 2008

Rules for Couples:

What is a definition of Marriage?

It is defined as,” the union of a man and woman to live together as husband and wife according to the standard set out in the holy scriptures. Marriage is a divine institution. It provides for intimate relationship between husband and wife along with a feeling of security because there is a climate of love and because a personal commitment has been made by each mate. When establishing marriage God did so not only to provide a close companion who would be a compliment of man but also to make provision for producing more humans and doing so with a family arrangement.”

 What can help to Improve a Marriage? 

If you are a christian the following elements can be very helpful .

  1. Studying God’s Word together and praying to God for help in resolving problems.

  2. Appreciating the principle of headship. This puts a heavy responsibility on the husband. It also calls for earnest effort on the part of the wife. This point is a turn around in the 21st century where women are fighting for equality and men are opting to be wives. One reason why the rate of divorce it so high.

  3. Confining sexual interest to one’s  mate. Loving concern for the needs of the one’s mate can help to safeguard that one against temptation to wrong-doing. The bible confirms this in Proverbs 5:15-21 and Heb 13:4. 

  4.  Speaking in a kindly, considerate manner to each other, avoiding outbursts of anger, nagging, and hash critical remarks. ( Ephesians 4:31-32, Proverbs 15:1)

  5.  

     Being Industrious and dependable in caring for the family’s dwelling place and clothing, also in preparing wholesome meals. ( Titus 2:4) 

  6.  

     Humbly applying Bible Counsel whether you feel that the other one is doing everything he should or not. 

  7.  

     Giving attention to the development of personal qualities 

  8.  

     Providing needed Love, training, and discipline for the children ( in case where there are children)

      The the counselor’s point of view on marriage and relationships?

The best stories have conflict and so do the best marriages, According to  Bonnie Eaker Weil, PHD who is a relationship therapist in New York City, and she has an amazingly high success rate with clients, Ninety-eight percent of couples she counsels end up staying together. Bonne notes that adultery is the most common in relationships in which the partners are”too polite” to fight. Without conflict, there is no passion, but people need to know to fight right. Bonnie has an unusual approach to handling disputes. We will get back to her approach later.

Bonnie’s tested guide:

 (i) Make an appointment to talk with your spouse about a given issue. Early evening is the best. Don’t make it for just before bed time, during a meal, while drinking alcoholic beverages or while out on a date.

(i) One person should talk and other just listen during your appointment. The listener must suppress his/her own responses and wear an emotional bulletproof vest so that he takes in the information without taking things personally. ( he will get a turn to talk later on, so be patient)

(iii) Talk for no more than 10 minutes. Honor the other person’s feelings, motivations and accomplishments while expressing your needs in emphatic, loving language.

Example: If the issue is that your husband seems to work too much, tell him that you respect what he is doing and his role as a provider and that you love him for it.

(iv) Avoid Words that wound. Criticism, sarcasm and contempt are out of-bounds.

(Vi) Suggest Several options for solving the problem- say, a regular Saturday night date or a time when both of you can be together, away from cell phones and other interruptions.

(Vii) Have  the Listening spouse repeat what he has heard. Bonnie says that the spouse should mirror not only the request for change but also any praise. You really should wait the 24 hours- the listening spouse then validates your feelings ” understand how you feel” and either chooses a course of action or asks for his own turn to speak.

(Viii) Link the end of the quarrel to a positive – reconnect physically with a long hug or kiss, cuddling, etc. The action serves as a bridge to reconciliation and stimulates the same brain chemicals as failing in love. Bonnie’s routine is to dance around the house with her husband, which helps them focus on a shared fun instead of the disagreement.

Important:  Give up the idea of winning. If one person wins and the other loses, both of you lose.

Ref: Rabbi Zeilig Pliskin in a book – Harmony with others 

 Keep this Notes you may need them one day.

Thanks a trillion .

Belliah K Theise

 

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Baby born with 2 faces in India, diagnosed with craniofacial duplication

This baby -- with two faces, two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes -- was born about 30 miles east of New Delhi, India. She is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess.

This baby — with two faces, two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes — was born about 30 miles east of New Delhi, India. She is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess. (AP PHOTO BY GURINDER OSAN)  Click here to find out more!

SAINI SUNPURA, India – A baby with two faces was born in a northern Indian village, where she is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess, her father said Tuesday.

The baby, Lali, apparently has an extremely rare condition known as craniofacial duplication, where a single head has two faces. All of Lali’s facial features are duplicated except for her ears–she has two. Otherwise, she has two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes.

“My daughter is fine–like any other child,” said Vinod Singh, 23, a poor farm worker.

Lali has caused a sensation in the dusty village of Saini Sunpura, 25 miles east of New Delhi. When she left the hospital, eight hours after a normal delivery on March 11, she was swarmed by villagers, said Sabir Ali, the director of Saifi Hospital.

“She drinks milk from her two mouths and opens and shuts all the four eyes at one time,” Ali said.

Rural India is deeply superstitious and the little girl is being hailed as a return of the Hindu goddess of valor, Durga, a fiery deity traditionally depicted with three eyes and many arms.

Up to 100 people have been visiting Lali at her home every day to touch her feet out of respect, offer money and receive blessings, Singh told The Associated Press.

“She is the reincarnation of a goddess,” said Lakhi Chand, a 65-year-old farmer who came to see Lali from neighboring Haryana state.

“Lali is God’s gift to us,” said Jaipal Singh, a member of the local village council. “She has brought fame to our village.”

Village chief Daulat Ram said he planned to build a temple to Durga in the village.

“I am writing to the state government to provide money to build the temple and help the parents look after their daughter,” Ram said.

Lali’s condition is often linked to serious health complications, but the doctor said she was doing well.

“She is leading a normal life with no breathing difficulties,” said Ali, adding that he saw no need for surgery.

Lali’s parents were married in February 2007. Lali is their first child.

Singh said he took his daughter to a hospital in New Delhi where doctors suggested a CT scan to determine whether her internal organs were normal, but Singh said he felt it was unnecessary.

“I don’t feel the need of that at this stage as my daughter is behaving like a normal child, posing no problems,” he said.

 

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Posted by Belliah K Theise

I read this in one of the latest magazines, and thought of sharing it to women like me who regularly use lipstick like myself.

According to the investigative report , “New evidence confirms that even low levels of lead pose serious risks to women’s health. Lead is a neurotoxin that accumulated in the body, so exposure to small amounts can create overload that results in fatigue, nervousness and depression,” reports Carolyn Dean, M.D, ND.

According to the report, “a recent investigation by the campaign for safe Cosmetics (CSC) revealed that among 33 lipsticks tested, one third exceeds the FDA’s limit for lead in candy.” The report continued to state that, this fact has some expert urging caution because the average woman inadvertently swallows 4 to 6 pounds of lipstick in life time.

What you should do:

Sidestep overload risk with extra calcium that can sop up lead. In one study, women who supplemented with the Calcium for six months lowered their blood levels of the lead by 16 percent. Garlic and Cilantro have shown to halt the cycle in studies that were conducted by Jordan University of science & Technology.

From my home library to yours.

Belliah K Theise

 

 

 

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b6_edited.jpegthandiwe.jpgclassy-daddy-3.jpgone-zambia-one-nation.jpg

In every country there is rich and poor. For those who never experienced poverty in their up bringing, poverty is a tale. We hope politicians that are out to make change in the society should remember the legacy  to bring change. Zambian chronicle is here for change. Some clips below are here to show how important every child is. No matter, which environment or place they are being raised in. Poverty will never stop them, they dance, they play drums with their inborn skills and talent. 

Most of us at Zambian chronicle grew up with no resources, limited education system, walked to school, no lunch packs. That did not stop us, we made it, and grew up with hearts to reach out to other people with our limited resources. our legacy is to help kids( boys and girls) and women, By bringing out the positive side of this world. 

We expect Zambian presidential candidates to focus on  important issues like education, to help the future generation to be better leaders and reach their dreams.

 

Zambian Chronicle’s legacy:- Next Zambian President should bring hope to the future generation. Please all Zambian leaders should address the problems below:

v=8c1ByH_oMz4&feature=related]

Tribal Zambian Party

Zambian kids dancing

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b6_edited.jpegNegative Campaign ,Malicious Rumors, Gossip and Hatred on Aspiring presidential candidates are set backs and can bring a Destruction in Voting for a Great President. 

By Belliah K Theise

Having followed USA presidential debates and making comparisons of what is going on in the entire world with politics, we found similar paterns that has made third world countries be the way they are now, in terms of economy.

Here is what we have to say at Zambian chronicle:

As a presidential candidate aspiring for a public office, or you may be a voter. This is a time to revisit your weaknesses and try to improve on them.

Listed below are some of the things future Leaders should avoid in order to maintain peace and trust in people who they lead.

1.      Negative campaigns that may bring damage to the image of  the country and future leaders.

2.      Malicious Rumors, without meaning or basis

3.      Cheap Gossip

4.      Hatred

5.      Tribal 

6.  Racial discrimination 

  By all means, the above six elements  should not be used as a tool to bring down your rival or to pick a right candidate for president. Positive campaign builds and unites nations. Negative campaigns, brings anger, violent and divisions.

As a voter, learn to validate each rumor, do not be a follower.  Learn to use your own discretion, good sense of judgement and common sense, in critical matters like choosing or picking the right candidate as your commander in Chief.  Avoid operating like robots that are programed to perform certain functions.  Operating like a robot, makes both leaders and their voters look like idiots, when things go sour.

Important factor to Remember :

Separate Hollywood gossip of celebrities to  a presidential candidate gossip. We do understand that, there is no smoke without fire , but on the other hand,  Learn to separate facts from gossip,  Every voter should know that, NOT every rumor or gossip comes out to be 100% true. You as voters only  come to realize when it is too late, after you have voted for a wrong person, because you based your judgement on rumors.  People use rumors and gossip  for many reasons. May be for financial gain, hatred or other things.

Always keep in mind that, we humans always enjoy negatives, We all focus on unproductive rumors and gossip, that diverts us from dealing with serious topics that is affecting the country.  If a negative outweighs a positive side of a candidate, it takes away all the good work he/she has done.

Remember, Media and campaigns are there to help voters to pick the best candidate, but at the same time, politicians uses that as a tool to bring down their rival candidates, depending  how strong one has links to the media.  Many great leaders are brought down in no seconds, and voters end up voting for useless candidates.

Again… use your common sense and your good judgement, when you read negatives that comes flying on potential candidates.

Good luck to all the presidential candidates, as they go on the road to lead their nations with a passion at heart for their people. Stay focused on important issues that affects your country. Do not get rapped up in personal issues, that can bring harm to your country and comes back to haunt you.

You all have one purpose:- To save your nation with integrity. The same people you are trying to persuade to vote for you, will be the same people who will vote you out. Voters always keep a record. Campaign with a passion for your people and country at heart.

For voters, validate your candidates with facts, and basing your votes on malicious rumors or unproductive  gossip , that will not do good to your country in the future, will not help.

Thanks a trillion

Belliah K Theise

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(CNN) — U.S. health officials said Wednesday they have found a contaminant in a blood-thinning drug produced by Baxter Healthcare Corp. that has been linked to more than a dozen deaths in the United States.

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The drug can keep potentially life-threatening blood clots from forming in the veins, arteries, and lungs.

In early February, the Food and Drug Administration launched an investigation and then a recall of some forms of the product.

The scrutiny began after a spike in reports of health problems associated with heparin, a drug made by Baxter from pig intestines at plants in China and Wisconsin.

Though the cause of the problems has not been determined, FDA investigators found “a heparin-like compound — that is not heparin — present in some of the active pharmaceutical ingredients” in both facilities, said Dr. Janet Woodcock, acting director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

The contaminant, which made up 5 percent to 20 percent of each sample tested, “reacts like heparin in some of the conventional tests used for heparin,” which explains why it was not picked up, she told reporters in a conference call.

No causal link between the contaminant and the adverse events has been established yet, Woodcock said.

She added that it was not clear whether the contaminant was added accidentally, as part of the processing or deliberately.

It also was not clear whether the contaminant was introduced in the company’s plant in Wisconsin or the one in China, Woodcock said.

Though she said the exact structure of the contaminant has not been identified, “it is similar to heparin glycans.” Glycans are polysaccharides, a complex class of carbohydrate.

She added it was unclear whether other heparin products used outside the United States might also contain the product.

Later this week, the agency will release recommendations on how manufacturers and regulators can screen for the contaminant, she said.

Last year, pet food made in China was found to be tainted with an ingredient that replaced more expensive protein and that initial tests did not identify as a contaminant. Asked if the heparin contamination could be a similar case, Woodcock said, “It’s possible.”

Doctors have used the blood-thinner for 60 years with “no history of any problems whatsoever,” said the FDA commissioner, Dr. Andrew C. von Eschenbach.

Its intravenous use can keep potentially life-threatening blood clots from forming in the veins, arteries and lungs.

Von Eschenbach said it would be “disingenuous” to expect the agency would be able to inspect “every institution in every case.”

Over the last fiscal year, the agency reported having inspected more than 1,000 foreign plants, a record.

Since the agency issued its report that 19 deaths had been linked to the drug since January 1, 2007, it has received word of another 27 deaths, “but many of those do not fit our definition of this type of event,” Woodcock said.

In all, the FDA has received 785 heparin-linked reports of adverse events — including difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, excessive sweating and plummeting blood pressure that can lead to life-threatening shock.

“They’re continuing to come in fairly rapidly because there has been a lot of reporting of this,” she said.

In a written statement, Baxter said its tests have suggested “that the root cause may be associated with the crude heparin, sourced from China, or from the subsequent processing of that product before it reaches Baxter.”

Meanwhile, Scientific Protein Laboratories LLC, which supplies the company with the active pharmaceutical ingredients, issued a statement saying it is working with the FDA, Baxter and outside experts to identify the cause of the adverse events.

“Thus far, no conclusions have been reached about the root cause,” it said.

“It is premature to conclude that the heparin active pharmaceutical ingredient sourced from China and provided by SPL to Baxter is responsible for these adverse events.”

It said that its voluntary recall of suspect product was being made as a precaution. 

CNN

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