HIV


Baby born with 2 faces in India, diagnosed with craniofacial duplication

This baby -- with two faces, two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes -- was born about 30 miles east of New Delhi, India. She is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess.

This baby — with two faces, two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes — was born about 30 miles east of New Delhi, India. She is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess. (AP PHOTO BY GURINDER OSAN)  Click here to find out more!

SAINI SUNPURA, India – A baby with two faces was born in a northern Indian village, where she is doing well and is being worshipped as the reincarnation of a Hindu goddess, her father said Tuesday.

The baby, Lali, apparently has an extremely rare condition known as craniofacial duplication, where a single head has two faces. All of Lali’s facial features are duplicated except for her ears–she has two. Otherwise, she has two noses, two pairs of lips and two pairs of eyes.

“My daughter is fine–like any other child,” said Vinod Singh, 23, a poor farm worker.

Lali has caused a sensation in the dusty village of Saini Sunpura, 25 miles east of New Delhi. When she left the hospital, eight hours after a normal delivery on March 11, she was swarmed by villagers, said Sabir Ali, the director of Saifi Hospital.

“She drinks milk from her two mouths and opens and shuts all the four eyes at one time,” Ali said.

Rural India is deeply superstitious and the little girl is being hailed as a return of the Hindu goddess of valor, Durga, a fiery deity traditionally depicted with three eyes and many arms.

Up to 100 people have been visiting Lali at her home every day to touch her feet out of respect, offer money and receive blessings, Singh told The Associated Press.

“She is the reincarnation of a goddess,” said Lakhi Chand, a 65-year-old farmer who came to see Lali from neighboring Haryana state.

“Lali is God’s gift to us,” said Jaipal Singh, a member of the local village council. “She has brought fame to our village.”

Village chief Daulat Ram said he planned to build a temple to Durga in the village.

“I am writing to the state government to provide money to build the temple and help the parents look after their daughter,” Ram said.

Lali’s condition is often linked to serious health complications, but the doctor said she was doing well.

“She is leading a normal life with no breathing difficulties,” said Ali, adding that he saw no need for surgery.

Lali’s parents were married in February 2007. Lali is their first child.

Singh said he took his daughter to a hospital in New Delhi where doctors suggested a CT scan to determine whether her internal organs were normal, but Singh said he felt it was unnecessary.

“I don’t feel the need of that at this stage as my daughter is behaving like a normal child, posing no problems,” he said.

 

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Posted by Belliah K Theise

I read this in one of the latest magazines, and thought of sharing it to women like me who regularly use lipstick like myself.

According to the investigative report , “New evidence confirms that even low levels of lead pose serious risks to women’s health. Lead is a neurotoxin that accumulated in the body, so exposure to small amounts can create overload that results in fatigue, nervousness and depression,” reports Carolyn Dean, M.D, ND.

According to the report, “a recent investigation by the campaign for safe Cosmetics (CSC) revealed that among 33 lipsticks tested, one third exceeds the FDA’s limit for lead in candy.” The report continued to state that, this fact has some expert urging caution because the average woman inadvertently swallows 4 to 6 pounds of lipstick in life time.

What you should do:

Sidestep overload risk with extra calcium that can sop up lead. In one study, women who supplemented with the Calcium for six months lowered their blood levels of the lead by 16 percent. Garlic and Cilantro have shown to halt the cycle in studies that were conducted by Jordan University of science & Technology.

From my home library to yours.

Belliah K Theise

 

 

 

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By William Smith and Wendy Turnbull, RH Reality Check. Posted April 1, 2008.

Earlier this month, Population Action International (PAI) and the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) teamed up to conduct a joint policy research trip to Zambia. Zambia is one of the 15 focus countries prioritized to receive global U.S. HIV/AIDS assistance. Zambia was also one of the first countries where PAI documented, in 2003, the destructive impact of the Global Gag Rule (also known as the Mexico City policy) on family planning and reproductive health care services.

Other criteria, however, also made Zambia an ideal country through which to answer many questions about the effects of U.S. policy and funding. Long before PEPFAR’s arrival, a conservative religious environment defined Zambian society, within which the promotion of abstinence and marriage were already strong currents in everyday life.

First, what would the effect be after four years of the U.S. putting nearly $577 million into the country under policies that disproportionately emphasize these strategies over a more comprehensive HIV- prevention approach that included condom education and distribution?

Second, how are PEPFAR policies interpreted and implemented in this environment? And have they exacerbated the dire sexual and reproductive health and rights situation in Zambia, where rural family planning and reproductive health outreach collapsed after the country’s leading SRHR provider refused the terms of the Global Gag Rule?

Third, has U.S. assistance harmonized with other donors and what has the Zambian government’s role been in the midst of this? And finally, and perhaps most importantly, what are the needs of the health care workers on the ground and the Zambian people themselves in attempting to stem the generalized HIV epidemic in the country?

Having returned from the research trip to Zambia, PAI and SIECUS will be answering these key questions over the next several weeks and reporting on our findings and educating Members of Congress and their staff about how U.S. policy and assistance really plays out in the field. We’ll also be collaborating with and supporting Zambian NGO colleagues to increase SRHR advocacy with their own policymakers.

Immediately, however, we wanted to share some disturbing observations from our research interviews that both advocates and lawmakers should consider long and hard during Congressional recess and in preparation for floor consideration of PEPFAR reauthorization in a few weeks.

1) By all appearances, reproductive health seems to have vanished from Zambia both conceptually and as a health service. At the policy level, there is no official framework for SRHR. At the program level, sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services are thin and fall far short of demand. Rates of maternal death, unplanned pregnancy and unsafe abortion — especially among young women — are persistently high. Contraceptive stockouts have become more frequent and community-based SRH outreach throughout rural Zambia is non-existent, thanks to the Global Gag Rule. While the U.S. is one of a handful of donors providing FP/RH assistance and donated contraceptives to Zambia (about $6 million in FY07, compared with $216 million in PEPFAR funding), this small amount of U.S. assistance is hamstrung by Global Gag Rule restrictions and consequently is narrowly focused on providing technical assistance to the public sector.

2) While we observed and documented some impressive prevention programming funded with PEPFAR, it is as far from a comprehensive approach as one can imagine. Higher risk groups, such as sex workers, seem mostly neglected by PEPFAR and rarely talked about in a country with major trucking routes and new copper mines drawing migrant workers from the region. Condoms, as well, are not as actively promoted or distributed as they were pre-PEPFAR in Zambia — where prevalence is around 17 percent and rises to 30 percent or more in some parts of the country. And based on our conversations with Zambian and U.S. NGO staff, there is a lot of confusion about what you can and can’t say about condoms under PEPFAR. The notion that other donors — miniscule in comparison to PEPFAR — will step in to meet needs specifically jettisoned by PEPFAR in practice has not been borne out in Zambia.

3) Sexuality education is the missing foundation for effective prevention of the sexual transmission of HIV/AIDS. In one classroom, we observed a group of students being told that certain body fluids can transmit HIV. The students looked utterly bewildered and the skilled educators realized that it was because these students had a deficit in the basics of how their bodies work. The educators stepped in to describe what these body fluids were, but no patchwork quilt of HIV/AIDS prevention is going to maintain a long-term curbing of the epidemic if the education system does not play its part and begin providing comprehensive sexuality education as a foundation for other efforts.4) PEPFAR in Zambia operates largely in isolation. This has been observed in other PEPFAR focus countries and is endemic to the U.S. approach to foreign policy in other settings. This has profound implications for harmonizing with the Zambian government and its priorities for tackling the epidemic, as well as for coordinating with other donors to minimize duplication and maximize comparative advantages. For example, while it is true that the Zambian government works with the PEPFAR team there to develop an annual “country operational plan,” it is a bit akin to a borrower setting the entirety of the terms for a bank loan — it just doesn’t work that way. Zambian providers and advocates repeatedly told us that U.S. political priorities drive PEPFAR planning and programming, not the reality of HIV/AIDS on the ground.

5) Again, as seen in other focus countries, PEPFAR has created a discernible break between local NGOs and international and U.S.-based groups working in the country. The experience of many Zambian NGOs is that PEPFAR has not benefited from the development and capacity building of indigenous groups doing this work, but rather has led to the growth of U.S.-based NGOs, especially faith-based groups, who are the major recipients of PEPFAR’s largesse. That said, international and U.S. NGOs are clearly doing impressive work in the areas of treatment and care under PEPFAR, but at present the relatively tiny investment in home-grown, Zambian NGO efforts on the prevention side speaks to concerns about the sustainability of current activities and the development of Zambian professionals to lead this work in the future.

Reauthorization of PEPFAR’s prevention components needs to move beyond the persistence of the destructive political and ideological shenanigans of the bill’s first iteration. To this end, our field research in Zambia highlights key areas that must be addressed if PEPFAR’s promise is to be truly realized, and new infections averted.

Digg!

See more stories tagged with: pepfar, international policy, hiv/aids, reproductive justice

William Smith is Vice President for Public Policy at the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS).Wendy Turnbull is the Senior Policy Research Analyst at Population Action International (PAI).

Source: AlterNet.org

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In every country there is rich and poor. For those who never experienced poverty in their up bringing, poverty is a tale. We hope politicians that are out to make change in the society should remember the legacy  to bring change. Zambian chronicle is here for change. Some clips below are here to show how important every child is. No matter, which environment or place they are being raised in. Poverty will never stop them, they dance, they play drums with their inborn skills and talent. 

Most of us at Zambian chronicle grew up with no resources, limited education system, walked to school, no lunch packs. That did not stop us, we made it, and grew up with hearts to reach out to other people with our limited resources. our legacy is to help kids( boys and girls) and women, By bringing out the positive side of this world. 

We expect Zambian presidential candidates to focus on  important issues like education, to help the future generation to be better leaders and reach their dreams.

 

Zambian Chronicle’s legacy:- Next Zambian President should bring hope to the future generation. Please all Zambian leaders should address the problems below:

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Tribal Zambian Party

Zambian kids dancing

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Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

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UN warns on food price inflation

Pakistani women at subsidised food store 03.03.08

Governments are urged to take action to help ease rising prices

The head of the UN World Food Programme has warned that the rise in basic food costs could continue until 2010.Josette Sheeran blamed soaring energy and grain prices, the effects of climate change and demand for biofuels.

Miss Sheeran has already warned that the WFP is considering plans to ration food aid due to a shortage of funds.

Some food prices rose 40% last year, and the WFP fears the world’s poorest will buy less food, less nutritious food or be forced to rely on aid.

Speaking after briefing the European Parliament, Miss Sheeran said the agency needed an extra $375m (244m euros; £187m) for food projects this year and $125m (81m euros; £93m) to transport it.

This is not a short-term bubble and will definitely continue
Josette Sheeran
WFP

She said she saw no quick solution to high food and fuel costs.

“The assessment is that we are facing high food prices at least for the next couple of years,” she said.

Miss Sheeran said global food reserves were at their lowest level in 30 years – with enough to cover the need for emergency deliveries for 53 days, compared with 169 days in 2007.

Biofuel prices

Among the contributing factors to high food prices is biofuel production.

Miss Sheeran says demand for crops to produce biofuels is increasing prices for food stuffs such as palm oil.

Miss Sheeran said governments needed “to look more carefully at the link between the acceleration in biofuels and food supply and give more thought to it”.

The WFP says countries where price rises are expected to have a most direct impact include Zimbabwe, Eritrea, Haiti, Djibouti, the Gambia, Tajikistan, Togo, Chad, Benin, Burma, Cameroon, Niger, Senegal, Yemen and Cuba.

Areas where the WFP is already seeing an impact include:

  • Afghanistan: 2.5 million people in Afghanistan cannot afford the price of wheat, which rose more than 60% in 2007
  • Bangladesh: The price of rice has risen 25% to 30% over the last three months. In 2007, the price rose about 70%.
  • El Salvador: Rural communities are buying 50% less food than they did 18 months ago with the same amount of money. This means their nutritional intake, on an already poor diet, is cut by half.
  • Anger over rising food prices have already led to riots in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Senegal and Morocco.

    The BBC is planning a special day of coverage of this issue on Tuesday 11 March, online, on radio and on TV.

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    b6_edited.jpegBy Belliah K Theise

    This week ‘s men topic is on Potbelly. How do you like your gut? Some women like men with guts and some do not. The question to ask yourself other than attraction is, Do you feel health with your big potbelly?  

    More on Mens Page…….

    Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

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    By Belliah K Theise

    March 01 2008

    “Not everyone should eat the same thing or do the same excercise. What food we absorb well and how our bodies handle stress differ with each blood type.” Says Dr Peter D’Adamo.

    According to Dr Peter, He explains which foods,spices,teas and condiments help someone of your blood type maintain optimal health and idea weight. In additions,one need to know which vitamins and suppliments to take or to avoid.

    What is your blood type?

    Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

    Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

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    b6_edited.jpeg01 February 2008:
    Published by: Belliah K Theise
    COO and Managing editor
    Zambian women demand for further investigation on Depo- provera contraceptive injection drug.
    As a Zambian woman, I am not convinced  that this drug is 100% safe. 
    According to the studies and research, this drug not only speeds the growth of virus and other STDs deseases, it also results in significant loss of bone density, and that the loss is greater the longer the drug is administered. Reported by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on November 17, 2004 Document number T04-50. ( Black Box Warning)
    I am not here to accuse Anyone, on behalf of Zambian women, I seek further investigation on Depo-provera contraceptive injection.
    I am here to make a plea on behalf of every  woman on this earth.We women deserve life. We are not monkeys or rats.
    The demand for further investigation is due to the research that I did on my own, as I am concerned being a mother of two girls and have sisters who have been on this drug since 2006.
    I lost one of my sisters who had a very weired growth on the neck and genitals.  Doctors in Zambia dioganized it as cancer.
    The study that was done on March 2,2003 at McMaster University in Canada stated that  “the findings suggest that women who use Depo-provera might be particulary susceptible to developing genital herpes when exposed to the virus.”
    Kaushic who conducted the study was also not convinced when the drug company spokesperson defended the drug.
    “Kaushic noted that the new findings add to past research suggesting that Depo- provera can increase the risk of other STDs, including chlamydia.
    After this study LifeSiteNews.com issued a warning in Newyork, on September 8, 2004 Titled ‘Family Planning’ groups spreading AIDS in Africa with Depo Provera, New study warns” the warning also stated: “From 1994-2000, USAID provided 41,967,200 units of Depo -Provera into developing world.”
    In 2004 The U.S Agency for Development(USAID) identified Repositioning Family planning as a priority for its work in Africa.
    According to the ACQUIRE project report- “Case studies were undertaken in three countries that have been successful in increasing contraceptive use and reducing fertility-Ghana,Malawi,and Zambia- so that lessons learned can be used to guide strategy development and identify key investment.”
    A three- person team conducted interviews and site visits in Zambia from February 14 to February 25,2005,interviewing 31 key informats and holding group discussions with community volunteers.”
    We need further investigations to make sure the drug does not speed up the virus. Since USAID’s intentions was to help Zambia women to reduce their fetility, They can still revisit the drug and demand for another study. In the mean time, Zambian women can use other measures like condoms and different contraceptive pills.
    We need someone to prove that the research that was done in 2003 and 2004 were wrong. We need to know why it was donated to Zambia in 2005, after  the study and FDA had issued a black Box warning against it stating that Dep-provera was not 100% safe.
    I have lost half members of my family. I just need further investigation for the future generation. We women are not looking for compasation. We are  not interested in anybody s money, we need life. That is all I am asking for, on behalf of women, not only in Zambia, but every woman on this earth, since it seems we are the target of experiments.

    For God’s sake Zambia needs medication to reduce the growth of virus, not to speed it up.

    With the history of what happened in Libya when the medical workers, who in May 2004 were sentenced to death on charges of intentionally infecting hundres of Libyan children with H.I.V, were freed and  international incident was averted, in eyes of Africans the medical workers release appears to be the latest episode in a health care nightmare in which white and Western- trained doctors and nurses have harmed Africans- and have gone unpunished” ( article by Harriet A Washington – Why Africa Fears Western Medicine-published: July 31,2007)

    As a Zambian woman, I am not convinced that Depo provera Contraceptive injection is 100% safe for a woman who has a virus in the body. It may not transmit AIDS, but it reduces the immunity system in woman’s body, and speeds up HIV virus.

    Just like Zambian women many American women have complained after using the drug, and no body is listening. What is wrong with you people. I do not want to mention the drug company that makes that drug, for security reasons, FDA report states that the drug company is aware of side effects of loss of bone density.

    Do you think the drug that contributes to the loss of bone density will be good for a country with high rate of women infected with HIV virus. Life expectant in Zambia is 32 – 33 years. Who will be left in zambia in the next 50 years if all women are put on the slow puncture drug?

    I have worked as a consultant and done a lot of research on drugs and by-products. I know what I am talking about.I know every law firm that represents this big companies, and all this bolonies.  This injectable drug do have side effects.

    My sister is six feet under. This is not about potential investiment opportunity, this is life at stake.This is not some sort of a joke  So why can’t leader s come up with a better solution to solve a problem? Please Investigate further, and give us a feed back. We are not here to sue each other, we are here to save lives. AIDS has affected the entire world, any drug that speeds HIV virus process should be removed from the market.

     It is like money has taken over the world. There are still many monkeys and animals that can be used for experiments. Please give a woman a break.

    Please can some one start listening to the horses mouth, instead of a drug company that is looking to maximise its profits?
    It is like the world has put women on death row. For heaven sake, A woman is an asset to the world. Why can’t the world listen to the cry of women. We women deserve life.

    Yes Depo provera does not transmit Aids,

    My Concern is, does it speed up the virus or reduces Immunity system? We woman of Zambia demand further investigations . Please we beg you. This drug may be good for a developed country with millions of hospitals and proper medication, Vitamins, immunity booster, but not for a country like Zambia.

    We need HIV medicine not something that can speed up the virus in the body.

    Thanks

    Belliah K Theise

    Chief Operating Officer and Managing Editor

    Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

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    Photo

    U.S. President George W. Bush greets Bridget Michelo Chisenga of the Catholic Relief Service of Zambia after a World AIDS Day meeting at the Calvery United Methodist Church in Mount Airy, Maryland, November 30, 2007.   

    Meanwhile, President Bush is urging Congress to approve the doubling of the U.S. commitment in the global fight against HIV and AIDS.

     

     Bush announced his intent to double America’s commitment to fighting global HIV/AIDS with the addition of $30 billion for the next five years.  

    Mr. Bush Friday said he was confident that U.S. lawmakers would show leadership by authorizing his proposal to spend $30 billion over the next five years.

    Mr. Bush spoke after meeting in a Maryland church with AIDS activists from various religious communities. He said World AIDS Day is a time of both sadness and hope. The day is marked around the world each year on December 1.

    He said those who have lost their lives to HIV/AIDS are mourned, while there is hope for improvements in the lives of those who are infected, and in eradicating the infection.

    Mr. Bush also announced he and his wife Laura Bush will travel to sub-Saharan Africa early next year, possibly including Zambia in his itinerary. Should that happen, Mr. Bush would be the first sitting US President to ever visit the Zambian Enterprise.

    classy-daddy-3.gifIn a statement for World AIDS Day, the head of UNAIDS, Peter Piot, said there is still a serious shortfall in resources for AIDS, and stigma and discrimination surrounding the disease continue to prevail.

    UNAIDS last week lowered its estimate of worldwide HIV infections, saying 32.7 million people were living with the virus in 2006 – nearly seven million fewer than previously estimated. HIV is the virus that causes AIDS … thanks a trillion.

    Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

    CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

    Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

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    Livingstone

    The World Bank has given Zambia $20 million to enhance the fight against HIV and AIDS in the country, says World Bank Vice-President for Human and Development Network, Joy Phumaphi.

    The money is in addition to the $42 million already released to the Zambian government since 2003 for its HIV and AIDS programmes.

    The World Bank has decided to hand over the money because of Zambia’s impressive record on programmes that focus on the prevention of HIV infections, unlike other countries that have only focused on treatment.

    Vice-President Phumaphi, who is in Zambia to attend a workshop for former African Heads of State on the HIV and AIDS pandemic, said Wednesday that Zambia was an ideal example for other countries in the Southern African region because it had handled the pandemic well.

    The World Bank would take the lessons learnt in Zambia to other countries to help them improve their anti-HIV and AIDS strategies, she said when she met Southern Province Deputy Permanent Secretary Aaron Zulu.

    Vice-President Phumaphi said the World Bank valued its partnership with Zambia and was impressed with the progress the country had made in improving the economy and creating opportunities in uplifting people’s standard of living.

    Deputy Permanent Secretary Zulu said the province had tremendously benefited from the World Bank through the Community Response to HIV and AIDS (CRAIDS) which funded 115 projects of which 87 had been completed.

    He said the CRAIDS projects were unique because they were run by community members themselves and this instilled a sense of ownership in them.

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