intellectual honesty


BBC Reports..

 

Difficult tasks await Kenyan MPs

By Karen Allen
BBC News, Nairobi

It had all the pageantry and trappings of a state ceremony.

Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki and ODM leader Raila Odinga arrive at parliament

The two leaders agreed the power-sharing deal last week

The national anthem, the guard of honour, the ceremonial dress – but this was a unique opening of parliament.

Kenya’s lawmakers are under the spotlight in a way never seen before.

Kenyans still stunned by post-election violence are vesting their trust in leaders in a country where in the recent past, they have been badly let down.

More than half of the members of parliament are newcomers and they will be expected to hit the ground running, to turn up to vote and pave the way for a historic coalition.

A coalition aimed at restoring unity to what the president described as “one Kenya”.

Stumbling blocks

It was a week to the day that a power-sharing deal had been agreed between President Mwai Kibaki and opposition leader Raila Odinga.

They shook hands in the presence of the world’s media, flanked by Kofi Annan and Tanzanian President Jakaya Kikwete.

Opening of Kenyan parliament 6/03/08
The new parliament began with two minutes of silence

That was just the start of a process. In the coming weeks lawmakers will be expected to enact legislation that will amend the constitution and allow a grand coalition to be formed.

They then have to try to “sell” the idea of power sharing to their constituents, among them people who are now homeless or who have lost loved ones in the violence.

There are still potential stumbling blocks ahead – in particular, how power will be shared and how cabinet posts and other senior positions will be allocated.

But for Thursday’s ceremony the tone was conciliatory and upbeat.

After a two minute silence – first for parliamentarians killed in post-election violence and then for “ordinary” Kenyans who lost their lives, President Kibaki rose to his feet.

In a 30-minute speech he stressed the need for last week’s peace accord to be quickly enacted into law, but warned that it would require “goodwill, unity, good faith and integrity” of Kenya’s lawmakers.

Awkward realities

This country is emerging from one of the darkest periods of its history and the coming weeks will be a real test of the commitment of all sides to a durable peace.

A member of the Kikuyu Mungiki gang threatens a man with a machete in Nairobi's Kibera slum, 10 January 2008

Some 1,500 people died in unrest after disputed poll results

Kenyans will be forced to confront some awkward realities with the establishment of a truth, justice and reconciliation commission to investigate past injustices and violence blamed on supporters on all sides of the political fence.

They will also be forced to compromise.

There are concerns that a grand coalition will rob Kenyans of a real opposition.

This has effectively been a deal between two political blocks – those supporting President Kibaki’s PNU and those backing Raila Odinga’s ODM.

Earlier in the day, diplomats insisted the onus would be on the media to help keep the government in check.

But what is clear is that this could be the start of a new pragmatism in Kenyan politics. A chance for a new breed of politician to shine, putting aside a past where winner takes all.

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There are several reasons we are calling for an end to Africa’s Longest Presidential Trial Now A Soap Opera … but we will try and excogitate on only a few for the time being. 

Going by our track record, every level-headed Zambian knows that we at the Zambian Chronicle don’t support any kind of nonsense, corrupt and otherwise that is a direct derivative of the former president’s behavior. 

Having said the above, we believe that every sane one of us will use intellectual honesty as a guiding principle as we deliberate on the following important matter.

We also understand that the matter is currently in the courts of law, therefore our deductive and inductive analyses will be limited to matters that may not be prejudicial in nature. 

As our video clip in Africa’s Longest Presidential Trial Now A Soap Opera … reveals, the prosecutor seems to be taunting evidence of customized shoes and telling the world that they are very expensive. 

Well, if those FTJ shoes are really expensive in the eyes of the prosecutor, then he has not seen anything really expensive yet. Our estimates are that those shoes probably cost close to $200.00 each and what is that for head of state.

We would like to believe that the Pope wears bullet-proof shoes paid for by the Vatican … image the cost!!

We are made to believe that government coffers were used to purchase small boat(s), if those boats on the video are auctioned at eBay, I guarantee you they wouldn’t even fetch a couple of thousand dollars … try it if you want! 

Tom Perkins’s yacht for example is estimated at $150,000,000 … and yes the zeroes are right; millions of dollars and you bring a simple boat that is worth nothing as an exhibit for a former head of state.

Watch Real Yachts In Action Above Not Simple Boats As Exhibits

Even the Mercedes Benz ML 350 shown does not cost over $50,000.00 brand new while the other vehicles in the clip can be imported from Dubai with a couple of thousands of dollars each.  

Give us a break, why is it that all the real estate in Europe since been recovered does not appear in the exhibits? Is it because those where in the Como part of the villas as opposed to the Colleyville side of human excellence and style? 

What we see in this is nothing but the lowest level of witch hunting and an explicit desire to exaggerate matters based on a high level of poverty. Poverty that has no understanding of real wealth and tritely no essence of comparison on a global scale. 

We have become a laughing stock of others who understand true wealth, the world shakes its head when it sees those small boats as exhibits and all perpetrators of this trial are seen as individuals that are self-interested in the crux of the matter. 

As long as the trial continues, the perpetrators will continue to draw a salary plundering the merger resources the Zambian Enterprise has. A question then arises as to who the true plunderers are and or might become.

We would like to believe that there are several avenues of entertainment value available to the general populace and this soap opera  that has lasted over seven years now is certainly not one of them.  

Those who would like to continue this saga so they can keeping feeding on it or those who actually are purported to have been stolen from the enterprise to purchase thousand dollars boats, custom make shoes and import used cars … 

We have said it before and we will say it again. If the man is guilty, please do us all a favor and lock him up as of yesterday. And if the man is not, end this nonsense … it certainly does not take seven years to figure that out unless of course somebody has nothing else to do should this be brought to an end. 

We appeal to all the powers that be to close this chapter for the Zambian Enterprise once and for all and don’t any body tell us it can’t be done in the first half of this year because it can. All it requires is a classy-daddy-3.gifphone call from somebody and or pressure from within, let alone without … 

It is costing us more perpetrating this trial not only in treasure and dignity but also in terms of the opportunity cost; and that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion.

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

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A great deal was accomplished last week in the Zambian Enterprise after the 338 members of the National Constitution Conference (NCC) were sworn in by the Chief Justice.

Now, whether some of them understood what they were up to, we don’t know but they are part of history in making for the Government of the Republic of Zambia (GRZ). 

Every body wants the best constitution possible and most want to copy from others out there so they can incorporate parts from them they think make those countries some with the best policy documents out there. 

If Kenyans ended up having the strongest constitution in the world, it is because they adopted a people-led path for its formulation. But overall, a constitution that lacks originality is just another document available for reference and not empowerment. 

Even the Constitution of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela is considered one of the best constitutions in the world because on paper it says all the nice things but its practical aspects are more despotic than republican despite being titled as such.  

For instance, Title 1 has 9 articles that are just the cream of the world for a people that have sovereign power to govern themselves. But overtly, Venezuela is considered a dictatorship in certain geo-political circles; despite strong reference to the preeminence of human rights, ethics and political pluralism espoused in Article 2 of its constitution.  

It is therefore, paramount that all the necessary aspects of our new constitution be of original intent not just be borrowed ideas that sound good on paper but show no originality. Those aspects need to relate to the Zambian Enterprise and its people on how we want to govern ourselves and how we want to prosper as a nation. 

A good constitution provides every citizen with the rights to nurture, it provides freedoms necessary to take advantage of all opportunities despite one’s background, it enhances every one’s chances to self-actualize and allows for every one to play their necessary roles in national development.

In 1795, Immanuel Kant in his philosophical sketch on perpetual peace wrote … “The only constitution which derives from the idea of the original compact, and on which all juridical legislation of a people must be based, is the republican.4

This constitution is established, firstly, by principles of the freedom of the members of a society (as men); secondly, by principles of dependence of all upon a single common legislation (as subjects); and, thirdly, by the law of their equality (as citizens).

The republican constitution, therefore, is, with respect to law, the one which is the original basis of every form of civil constitution. The only question now is: Is it also the one which can lead to perpetual peace?

In order not to confuse the republican constitution with the democratic (as is commonly done), the following should be noted. The forms of a state (civitas) can be divided either according to the persons who possess the sovereign power or according to the mode of administration exercised over the people by the chief, whoever he may be.

The first is properly called the form of sovereignty (forma imperii), and there are only three possible forms of it: autocracy, in which one, aristocracy, in which some associated together, or democracy, in which all those who constitute society, possess sovereign power.  They may be characterized, respectively, as the power of a monarch, of the nobility, or of the people.

The second division is that by the form of government (forma regiminis) and is based on the way in which the state makes use of its power; this way is based on the constitution, which is the act of the general will through which the many persons become one nation.

In this respect government is either republican or despotic. Republicanism is the political principle of the separation of the executive power (the administration) from the legislative; despotism is that of the autonomous execution by the state of laws which it has itself decreed.

Thus in a despotism the public will is administered by the ruler as his own will. Of the three forms of the state, that of democracy is, properly speaking, necessarily a despotism, because it establishes an executive power in which “all” decide for or even against one who does not agree; that is, “all,” who are not quite all, decide, and this is a contradiction of the general will with itself and with freedom.”

classy-daddy-3.gifWe are confident that all the 338 members of the NCC will take their duties seriously for the sake of the enterprise and will understand that this is a higher calling.

That calling demands a strong understanding of posterity and the knowledge of the fact that their work today will enhance our system of governance as a republic, afterall we are paying for it … 

Because the Zambian Enterprise is greater than any single one of us and that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian chronicle … thanks a trillion.

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.      

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We did it again!!!! This time by being included on the Wall Street Journal preferred blog list. Last time we earned the Featured Blog title from WordPress and that’s after winning the Blog of The Minute Award. 

The Wall Street Journal is the Gold Standard for the world in financial reporting and for us to be included as of Friday, November 23, 2007.  The article that made us hit the list was Dollar Sets a New Record Low – Money News 

Blog Posts About This Topic • 

Dollar hits Fresh Lows against Euro and Swiss Franc  westranchbeacon.com• 

Dollar Sets a New Record Low – Money News  zambianchronicle.com 

It goes without saying that we have made great strides in presenting ourselves as one of the most trusted sources for objective reporting. We will forever strive to be the best out there … classy-daddy-3.gif

As a privately and an independently wholly owned interactive media, Zambian Chronicle is committed to bringing only the best and most verifiable information to our audience. 

We would like to take this opportunity to thank all our patrons and pundits who give us all the reasons for wanting to be the best there is, the best way we know how. Happy holidays … thanks a trillion. 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.   

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Somehow it gets ingrained in our African minds that a culture of suffering, poverty and an unassuming nature is synonymous with life. For us for the most part, we tend to shun away from success, we tend to consider it a pariah. 

As long as we are getting along just fine, as long as life is not ducking a bad blow to us, it tends to be hallelujah all the way. It looks like we are fine with a life of a paycheck to another paycheck … an employee and not an employer, a worker not an owner; just listen to our politicians and you will get the grip. 

In fact, African nations are ranked at the bottom when it comes to prosperity by the World Economic Forum as revealed in Zambia’s Global Competitiveness Stinks, World Economic Forum Reveals …  not due to lack of resources and expertise, no, no, no. 

It is due to a lackluster approach to the basics and the tenants of human aspirations. We get into these group thinks that tell us that aspiration and ambition are wrong; and we buy into it. This is one of the major fallacies that have kept us behind for centuries. 

Does it surprise you that while Caucasoids, Australoids and Mongoloids were still living in curves, Negroids were busy building pyramids, inventing trigonometry, moving from Stone Age to the Iron Age, discovering astronomy and creating sundials, calendars, etc? 

But just what went wrong is the billion dollar question. Part of the answer lies in analyzing our culture and as long as we keep the same aspects of our cultural tenants, we will forever be at the receiving end in human civilization. 

What we need is a cultural revolution, one that tells our kids its okay to be a millionaire, its okay to be filthy rich as long as you are level-headed about it. I don’t know about you, but for me money is one thing I don’t like to worry about … there is too much of it around the world for me to be an outsider. 

We have been analyzing our blog stats and one area with the greatest number of hits per day has to deal with people wanting to read more about wealthy people around the world. This means that more people really want to be wealthy but just want to keep a low profile about it …

We will soon start exploring ways in which any person that visits our classy-daddy-3.gifsite can learn to start generating wealth at grand scales. We will be looking at ways to become rich using your current resources, starting businesses, networking and how that education is the easiest way to increasing one’s net worth. 

It is because of the above that we like to publish stories about some of the world’s wealthiest individuals. And that’s this week’s memo from us here at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion.

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.  

   

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2007-05-16-zambia-3_200.jpgFollowing our last memo on Maureen Mwanawasa As Zambia’s First Female President  a lot of interest was generated as to what the qualifications for the CEO of the Zambian Enterprise should be. 

First of all, we wish we could say it was all about the academic and or professional qualifications that should dictate one’s ascension to the highest office in the land. Unfortunately that’s just not the case … 

flag.gifThere are a lot of variables in play that make up the right mix to that ascension, however, and we would like to explore some of those in this week’s memo.

There are only two primary qualifications; one being one’s age and the other one’s nationality as dictated by our current constitution.  Others are predicated upon a fundamental concept of systems theory, a way of thinking about the world, a model that is followed wherever party politics are practiced.

With the above in mind the rest are up for the grabs and whoever can work the system to the fullest extent apparently ends up being the president of the Zambian Enterprise. We say working the system because that’s exactly what it is. A system is a set of interacting or interdependent entities, real or abstract, forming an integrated whole.

Being man-made systems, democracies normally have certain purposes and or objectives. They are designed to work as a coherent entity and whoever aspires to the office has to have a good understanding of their operational capacities. 

Systems are determined by choosing the relevant interactions we want to consider, plus choosing the system boundary and or, equivalently, providing membership criteria to determine which entities are part of the system, and which entities are outside of the system and are therefore part of the environment of the system. 

There are also closed systems and open systems but in a political environment one has to work within a closed system called a political party. It is no wonder no one wakes up and says he would be president tomorrow because a system has to be in place for one to achieve such an objective. 

Now, within a closed system are also other variables to consider such as membership, name recognition, positioning, timing, synergy and a whole lot others. While membership and name recognition are  the basic requirements, positioning and timing feed on each other to be functional. 

Synergy on the other hand is group determined, in other words the people within the system decide to choose leadership based on the maximum good for the collective. It is at this stage that they look at one’s qualifications; academic, professional and or otherwise as the best sale for their franchise. 

What we see in the first lady is her ability to work the system if she wants to be the next CEO of the Zambian Enterprise and with all operational capacities in place, the MMD as a  franchise can provide her the nomination which is hers for the taking unless of course she is not interested. 

classy-daddy-3.gifSo, with all the bluff and fluff about qualifications, it is all back to the basics otherwise we could have had the most educated and or professionally qualified person as the president of the Zambian Enterprise by now. 

Lastly, any such person wanting to make the grade can only be successful if they realized the importance of working within a system and that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion. 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.  

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by Dickson Jere

Photoflag.gifMoves to finally provide Zambia with its first post-independence constitution have stirred up a political hornet’s nest, with President Levy Mwanawasa’s accusations of treason failing to silence dissent.

While there is a general acceptance that a written constitution for the former British colony is long overdue, the normally mild-mannered Mwanawasa’s involvement has led to another deep rift after last year’s divisive elections.

“The constitution should be the basis of unity in a nation (but) … the constitution debate has been very divisive,” said Lee Habasonda, executive director of the Southern Africa Centre for Conflict Resulotions and Disputes.

“Both sides must exercise a bit of restraint and engage in constructive dialogue.”

In a bid to reach a national consensus on the constitution, 43 years after the former northern Rhodesia gained its independence, a special conference is expected to be held later this year with participants from across the political spectrum invited to attend.

But analysts say the project is being seriously hampered by the involvement of Mwanawasa, with some key players vowing to boycott the conference as it has been tailored to produce a document that favours the president and his camp.

“The composition of the conference is biased towards government and politicians. We shall not go there,” said Marian Munyinda, spokeswoman of the Oasis Forum, a coalition of civic groups.

Such suggestions have particularly annoyed Mwanawasa who introduced a bill that means any new constitution has to be approved by a broad-based conference instead of parliament where his party has a comfortable majority.

On learning earlier this month that his opponents were planning to stage demonstrations against the conference he remarked that “should I hear any more nonsense … they will be arrested and charged with treason.”

Michael Sata, the populist opposition leader who lost last year’s general election to Mwanawasa, has refused to be silenced and argues that Mwanawasa is not interested in having a truly open debate about the constitution.

“The whole process is a fraud because Mwanawasa wants to use it for political expediency,” said Sata.

“My party is not going to take part in the fraud.”

The main disagreement revolves around whether the constitution should specifically entrench rights on social issues such as housing and education rather than solely concentrating on basic legal and human rights.

Mwanawasa is strongly opposed to the idea of specifically according such rights in a country where poverty is endemic.

“If these rights are enshrined in the new constitution, no government is going survive. Presidents will be impeached for failure to provide employment, education and food because that will be breaching the constitution,” he said.

Emily Sikazwe, a popular women rights activist, pointed out that other countries such as South Africa enshrined social rights even if she acknowledged they may not be attained overnight.

“We don’t understand why Mwanawasa is opposed to these progressive provisions in the draft constitution,” she said.

A draft constitution was written in 2005 by a commission appointed by Mwanawasa, which recommended a reduction in presidential powers and laying out detailed human rights.

But Mwanawasa and his government reacted coolly to the proposals and have since pushed for the conference in what opponents see as a diversionary tactic.

Justice Minister George Kunda said the process would continue, regardless of any boycotts.

“We have listened to their concerns and we have taken them on board,” said Kunda.

Diplomats have been largely sympathetic towards Mwanawasa, despite some of his more controversial rhetoric.

“I think he means well. We have met him several times on this issue and he comes out convincing to the extent that he wanted to resign,” said one senior European diplomat.

Copyright © 2007 Agence France Presse. All rights reserved. The information contained in the AFP News report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of Agence France Presse.

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