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Why is that jetliner for British Airways parked ov’r yonder when all other flights from the same region go to Terminal 5 at London Heathrow? One would ask … It is being fumigated, Another would respond. Fumigated!!! Why?? The Other would inquire. Because it just landed from Zambia, Another would answer.

British Airliner at London Heathrow Airport

British Airliner at London Heathrow Airport - All Other Arriving Passenger Go Throw Terminal 5 Except Those Arriving From Lusaka

So all flights from Zambia have to be sent to that concourse? One would ask further. Yeep!!! Another would answer. I don’t get it … The Other would say. Well, sorry that you guys don’t seem to get it, Another would say. These jetliners coming from Zambia stink to high heavens and we are just trying to be hygienic around here.

 

Dog on it, you mean Zambians stink and are not hygienic? I have seen some dressed in the best not only in Zambia but also around the world. One would prod. Nope!!! Ain’t got nothing to do with the way they dress, Another would counter.

 

You got to work in the cargo bay to understand what I am talking about, Another would retort. You see, when that plane lands, it carries with it as cargo some of the most stinking staunches, from Kapenta, Chapatwa, Insefu, Ingulube all dried just to mention a few, Another continues.

 

Why can’t we ban them from carrying such things? One would probe. I guess we make some much money from charging excess luggage fees that we just wink an eye, The Other would add. I am glad you are finally getting it, Another would say.

 

So what we do is collect their money but humiliate them when they land in London because we have to ferry them in buses to the other concourse for connecting flights. Besides, have you been to Lusaka? Another would continue …

 

Nope!!! One and The Other would respond almost in unison. Well, their airport looks like you are landing in the former Soviet Union, Another would answer. But we don’t care because we make so much money on this route compared to others that we actually fly there four times a week … besides the fact that it is the same place where you have sporadic cholera outbreaks; we got to be more vigilant …

 

… it is embarrassing to say the least how the smart people of the Zambian Enterprise are being treated upon arrival in London, but much of the blame has to be carried by us. In one of our weekly memos entitled Success Corner: Do You Have A Perception Problem? You Can Get A Hang On It …  we wrote the following …

 

We can not control what others think about us entirely but we can certainly circumvent their perceptions of us. Each one of us needs to make sure that the perception of others towards us is positive because people respond based on their perception of what they anticipate would be our reactions to circumstances.

 

To be successful in any enterprise one needs to have the ability to read people and tailor antitheses to what he/she perceives to be the most logical derivative reaction(s) from the said subjects.”

 

In our case the Brits look at our airport, our customs clearing facilities and our concourse at Lusaka International Airport and because these infra-structures are such a sorry sight in the modern world we are treated with impunity when in their presence.

 

“Without the ability to control peoples’ perceptions one is at a loss for advancement in any endeavor be it family, enterprise and otherwise. Most people fail miserably in life and business not because of lack of expertise but because they do not have the ability to circumvent others’ perception(s) of themselves.”

 

I guarantee you, if Lusaka International Airport had the same structures as Washington’s Dulles International, New York’s JFK International, or Johannesburg International, we would not be treated the way we are right now.

 

Because we portray poverty at our departing airport we are treated with it at the point(s) of entry. We have to control that perception by the way we carry ourselves. We need a complete overhaul at Lusaka International Airport.

Our Passengers In London Are Sent To Part Of Heathrow Similar To Lusaka International Airport, Ferried By Bus To The Main Concourse ...

Our Passengers In London Are Sent To Part Of Heathrow Similar To Lusaka International Airport, Ferried By Bus To The Main Concourse ...

We need to create an environment similar to other premier world capitals. When a world class traveler lands in Lusaka, he/she wouldn’t have a sense of arriving at a provincial capital let alone a nation’s capital.

 

Now don’t you tell me we have no money!!! The Auditor General’s report for 2007 alone revealed government had squandered K14 trillion, O yes, trillions of Kwacha as in “thanks a trillion”. Do you know how far that would go in setting up an entirely new airport similar to at least London Gatwick?

 

That kind of money can create a total facelift for Lusaka International Airport and we would no longer have the same look as the former Soviet Union airports. If the current government has no idea on God’s earth how and where to find that money let them ask …

 

No one is going to find the money for us, we have the money already – we just have to move it around. No one is going to build an airport for us; we have to build it ourselves. No one is going to fund our own household needs we need to do that ourselves.

 

The more we do things that would give us a facelift that the world would see, the more respect we get from the world. The more we take care of our own business the more people would want to do business with us.

 

The more we improve ourselves and change the way others think about us the more others see us in a different light. We can’t say this enough, perception, perception, perception. Perception is everything.

 

Ed Louis Cole used to say, “… if you want to pull the crowds, set yourself ablaze.” It is time the smart people of the Zambian Enterprise set themselves ablaze and built a world-class international gateway at Lusaka International Airport …

Artist's impression of the new terminal five at Heathrow Airport. The terminal opened in April 2008 with the second phase due to open in 2011. Total Cost £4.2bn ...

Artist's impression of the new terminal five at Heathrow Airport. The terminal opened in April 2008 with the second phase due to open in 2011. Total Cost £4.2bn ...

Folks, we are dead serious about this. If the Zambian government doesn’t know how to get this done, let them consult us … our business consulting team will provide a project proposal for them, including all schematics, financing plans, cost recovery plans as well as operational plans, for a fee.

 

Of course the Brits like to do things in extremes sometimes we know that, they were our colonial masters, but much of what needs to be done is right below own noses.

 

And of course we can achieve anything we set our minds to … we are Zambians for crying out aloud, let’s change the way we are treated by improving where we come from.

 

Seriously, the smart people of the Zambian Enterprise deserve a better Lusaka International Airport and it is government’s duty to build or facilitate building one, come 2009.

 

Compliments of the Season, Live Long & Prosper; that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion.

 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO  & President – Zambian Chronicle 

 

Copyrights © 2008 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom. 

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2008 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

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LUSAKA (AFP) — Zambia’s international reserves hit over a billion dollars this year, the highest figure in the country’s history, the central bank governor announced on Saturday.
Caleb Fundanga said Zambia had recorded 1.1 billion dollars in foreign reserves up from 706 million dollars that the country accumulated in 2006.

“Zambia has continued to record favourable external sector performance resulting in an accumulation of gross international reserves of 1.1 billion in December 2007,” Fundanga said in a statement.

“This is the highest the country has ever accumulated,” he added.

He said Zambia’s economy is expected to grow by 6.2 percent in 2008, while the country’s inflation will remain at the single-digit level.

“The overriding objective of monetary policy in 2008 is to consolidate the gains made in establishing price stability by achieving a third consecutive year of single-digit inflation,” Fundanga said.

Zambia’s inflation rate stands at 8.9 percent.

He said the country will face major challenges next year due to the projected rise in prices of petroleum products at the international market and the higher electricity tariffs in the southern African region.

Copyright © 2007 AFP

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LUSAKA (Reuters) – The head of Zambia’s anti-drug unit has been arrested and charged with theft of public funds in a crackdown against corruption in Zambia, an official statement said on Wednesday.

Ryan Chitoba, 53, a former senior police officer who was recalled from retirement to head the Drug Enforcement Commission (DEC) was arrested and charged with theft of about 345 million Zambian kwacha.

Chitoba is the latest high profile figure to face corruption charges in the southern African country’s widest anti-graft crackdown, launched by President Levy Mwanawasa in 2002.

“The ACC has arrested … Ryan Chitoba on one count of theft of public funds totalling over 344.8 million,” Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC) spokesman Timothy Moono said in a statement.

Moono said Chitoba, who was already under suspension, had been charged together with two other top officials from the anti-drug agency.

Former Zambia President Frederick Chiluba is currently facing charges of theft of $488,000 in Treasury funds during the time he ruled the country between 1991 and 2001.

A number of key figures in Chiluba’s government have either been jailed for corruption or are facing serious graft charges.

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Somehow it gets ingrained in our African minds that a culture of suffering, poverty and an unassuming nature is synonymous with life. For us for the most part, we tend to shun away from success, we tend to consider it a pariah. 

As long as we are getting along just fine, as long as life is not ducking a bad blow to us, it tends to be hallelujah all the way. It looks like we are fine with a life of a paycheck to another paycheck … an employee and not an employer, a worker not an owner; just listen to our politicians and you will get the grip. 

In fact, African nations are ranked at the bottom when it comes to prosperity by the World Economic Forum as revealed in Zambia’s Global Competitiveness Stinks, World Economic Forum Reveals …  not due to lack of resources and expertise, no, no, no. 

It is due to a lackluster approach to the basics and the tenants of human aspirations. We get into these group thinks that tell us that aspiration and ambition are wrong; and we buy into it. This is one of the major fallacies that have kept us behind for centuries. 

Does it surprise you that while Caucasoids, Australoids and Mongoloids were still living in curves, Negroids were busy building pyramids, inventing trigonometry, moving from Stone Age to the Iron Age, discovering astronomy and creating sundials, calendars, etc? 

But just what went wrong is the billion dollar question. Part of the answer lies in analyzing our culture and as long as we keep the same aspects of our cultural tenants, we will forever be at the receiving end in human civilization. 

What we need is a cultural revolution, one that tells our kids its okay to be a millionaire, its okay to be filthy rich as long as you are level-headed about it. I don’t know about you, but for me money is one thing I don’t like to worry about … there is too much of it around the world for me to be an outsider. 

We have been analyzing our blog stats and one area with the greatest number of hits per day has to deal with people wanting to read more about wealthy people around the world. This means that more people really want to be wealthy but just want to keep a low profile about it …

We will soon start exploring ways in which any person that visits our classy-daddy-3.gifsite can learn to start generating wealth at grand scales. We will be looking at ways to become rich using your current resources, starting businesses, networking and how that education is the easiest way to increasing one’s net worth. 

It is because of the above that we like to publish stories about some of the world’s wealthiest individuals. And that’s this week’s memo from us here at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion.

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.  

   

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levy.jpgBy KASUBA MULENGA

PRESIDENT Mwanawasa has dropped Central Province minister, Sydney Chisanga and North-Western Province permanent secretary, Richard Salivaji, for unsatisfactory performance.

Mr Chisanga’s position has been taken over by Mr Adamson Banda while Mr Salivaji has been replaced by Kapiri Mposhi district commissioner, Jestone Mulando.

“In Central Province, I am not satisfied with the minister, Mr Chisanga’s performance and he is the only one I have asked to rest,” Dr Mwanawasa said.

The President announced the developments at a press conference at State House yesterday.

Dr Mwanawasa has also retired Ministry of Defence permanent secretary, Joe Chitafu, removed Agriculture and Cooperatives permanent secretary, Richard Chizyuka and Gender and Women in Development (GIDD) permanent secretary, Ireen Ngilazi.

Dr Isaac Khozozo Phiri of the University of Zambia replaces Mr Chizyuka while Matondo Monde takes over at GIDD.

Dr Mwanawasa has appointed Mufumbwe member of Parliament, Misheck Bonshe, and his Senanga counterpart, Clement Sinyinda, as deputy ministers for Home Affairs and Tourism, Environment and Natural Resources, respectively.

He appointed Sikongo member of Parliament, Mundia Ndalamei, as deputy minister of Works and Supply and moved Mr Benny Tetamashimba to the Ministry of Local Government and Housing where he has joined Mr Eustancio Kazonga.

The President has moved deputy minister of Education, Lucy Changwe, to the Ministry of Science and Technology and has transferred Ministry of Energy and Water Development permanent secretary, Dr Buleti Nsemukila to the same ministry.

Ministry of Energy and Water Development deputy minister, Friday Malwa, has gone to the Office of the Vice-President to replace Gladys Lundwe who has swapped positions with him.

Dr Mwanawasa has moved Northern Province permanent secretary, Joel Ngo, to the Ministry of Local Government and Housing.

He has promoted Lusaka district commissioner, Elijah Chisanga, to the position of permanent secretary for Lusaka Province to take over from
Ms Susan Sikaneta who moves to the Ministry of Home Affairs to replace Peter Mumba who goes to the Ministry of Energy and Water Development.

And Dr Mwanawasa announced that he had instructed MMD national secretary, Katele Kalumba, to include the issue of his successor on the agenda of the next MMD national executive committee meeting.

Dr Mwanawasa said he would want to hear the NEC members’ views about the person who would succeed him.

The President said, however, that he had his own preferences on the matter and was confident that the NEC would not object to his views on the likely successor.

Source: Zambia Daily Mail

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KARRATHA, Australia (AP) — For nearly three decades, Chinese peasants have left their villages for crowded dormitories and sweaty assembly lines, churning out goods for world markets. Now, China is turning the tables.

art.china.cars.ap.jpg

Robert Yu, president of Chinese car maker ZhongXing Automobile Auto, presents models in Tijuana, Mexico.

Here in the Australian Outback, Shane Padley toils in the scorching heat, 2,000 miles from his home, to build an extension to a liquefied natural gas plant that feeds China’s ravenous hunger for energy.

At night, the 34-year-old carpenter sleeps in a tin dwelling known as a “donga,” the size of a shipping container and divided into four rooms, each barely big enough for a bed. There are few other places for Padley to live in this boomtown.

Duct-taped to the wall is a snapshot of the blonde girlfriend he left behind and worries he may lose. But, he says, “I can make nearly double what I’d be making back home in the Sydney area.”

The reason: China.

For years, China’s booming economy touched daily life in the West most visibly through the “made-in-China” label on everything from clothes to computers. But now, economic growth is giving rise to something more that can’t be measured just by widgets and gadgets — a shift in China’s balance of power with the rest of the world.

China’s reach now extends from the Australian desert through the Sahara to the Amazonian jungle — and it’s those regions supplying goods for China, not just the other way around. China has stepped up its political and diplomatic presence, most notably in Africa, where it is funneling billions of dollars in aid. And it is increasingly shaping the lifestyle of people around the world, as the United States did before it, right down to the Mandarin-language courses being taught in schools from Argentina to Virginia.

China, like the United States, is also learning that global power cuts both ways. The backlash over tainted toothpaste and toxic pet food has been severe, as has the criticism over China’s support for regimes such as Sudan’s.

To understand why China’s influence is increasingly pushing past its borders, just do the math.

When 1.3 billion people want something, the world feels it. And when those people in ever increasing numbers are joining a swelling middle class eager for a richer lifestyle, the world feels it even more.If China’s growth continues, its consumer market will be the world’s second largest by 2015. The Chinese already eat 32 percent of the world’s rice, build with 47 percent of its cement and smoke one out of every three cigarettes.

China’s desire for expensive hardwood to turn into top-quality floorboards for its luxury skyscrapers has penetrated deep into the Amazon jungle. For example, in the isolated community of Novo Progresso, or New Progress in Portuguese, one of the biggest sawmills was started by the mayor with financing from Chinese investors.

China accounts for 30 percent of the wood exported from logging operations in remote towns across Brazil’s rain forest, where trucks carry the finished product hundreds of miles along muddy roads to river ports, said Luiz Carlos Tremonte, who heads an influential wood industry association. Many Chinese purchasers now travel to Brazil to clinch deals, and are almost always accompanied at business meetings by friends or relatives of Chinese descent who live there.

“Ten years ago no one knew about China in Brazil; then the demand just exploded and they’re buying a lot,” Tremonte said. “This wood is great for floors, and they love it there.”

The Bovespa stock index in Brazil has climbed more than 300 percent since 2002, riding the China wave.

China is buying coal mining equipment from Poland and drilling for oil and gas in Ethiopia and Nigeria. It has poured hundreds of millions of dollars into Zambia’s copper industry. It is the world’s biggest market for mobile phones, headed for 520 million handsets this year. The list goes on.

Along with looking to other countries for goods for its people, China is also going far and wide in search of markets for its products.

In war-torn Liberia, where electricity is hard to come by, Chinese-made Tiger generators keep the local economy humming. Costlier Western brands, favored by aid agencies and diplomats, are beyond the reach of small business owners such as Mohammed Kiawu, 30, who runs a phone stall in the capital, Monrovia.

A used Tiger generator costs around $50, he said over the steady beat of his generator. “But even $250 is not enough to buy a used American or European generator. They are not meant for people like myself.”

The Chinese generators are more prone to break down, Kiawu said. When the starter cable snapped on one, he replaced it with twine. But by making items for ordinary people, he predicted, China “will take control of the heart of the common people of Africa soon.”

China is having to make up for decades of economic stagnation after the communist takeover in 1949.

When Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping began dabbling in economic reforms in 1978, farmers were scraping by. By 2005, income had increased sixfold after adjusting for inflation to $400 a year for those in the countryside and $1,275 for urban Chinese, according to China’s National Bureau of Statistics.

“The Chinese don’t want war — the Chinese just want to trade their way to power,” said David Zweig, a professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. “In the past, if a state wanted to expand, it had to take territory. You don’t need to grab colonies any more. You just need to have competitive goods to trade.”

If China stays on the same economic track, it would become the world’s largest economy in 2027, surpassing the United States, according to projections by Goldman, Sachs & Co., a Wall Street investment bank. And unlike Japan, which rose in the 1980s only to fade again, China still has a huge pool of workers to tap and an emerging middle class that is just starting to reach critical mass. Many development economists believe China still has 20 years of fairly high growth ahead.

But the transition to a larger presence on the global stage comes with growing pains, for China and the rest of the world.

As Beijing plays an ever bigger role in the developing world, some Western countries fear it could undermine efforts to promote democracy. In its attempt to secure markets and win allies, China is stepping up development aid to Africa and Asia. Chinese President Hu Jintao pledged last year to double Chinese aid to Africa between 2006 and 2009, promising $3 billion in loans, $2 billion in export credits and a $5 billion fund to encourage Chinese investment in Africa. China has also promised Cambodia a $600 million aid package and agreed to loan $500 million to the Philippines for a rail project.

But China also extends aid to states such as Myanmar, Zimbabwe and Sudan whose human rights records have lost them the support of the West. Actress Mia Farrow has labeled next year’s Beijing Olympics — a point of pride for China — the “genocide Olympics” because of China’s support for Sudan, at a time when the West seeks to punish it for its military actions in Darfur. China buys two-thirds of Sudan’s oil output.

“In some ways, it will be integrating us into a new international order in which democracy as we’ve known it or the right to open organized political activity is no longer considered the norm,” said James Mann, author of “The China Fantasy,” a book about China and the West.

China is also facing some of the unease that powers before it have encountered. In Africa and Asia, some complain that massive China-funded infrastructure projects involve mostly Chinese workers and companies, rather than create jobs and wealth for the local population. And Moeletsi Mbeki, a political commentator and brother of South African President Thabo Mbeki, likens the trade of African resources for Chinese manufactured goods to former colonial arrangements.

“This equation is not sustainable,” Mbeki said at a recent meeting of the African Development Bank in Shanghai. “Africa needs to preserve its natural resources to use in the future for its own industrialization.”

The backlash is also coming on the consumer front, with Chinese goods earning a dubious reputation for quality. In the United States, there is a furor over the standard of Chinese imports. In Bolivia, vendors peel off or paint over any indication that their wares were “Hecho en China,” Spanish for “Made in China.”

A woman selling bicycles in El Alto, a poor city outside the capital, La Paz, insisted they were made in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan or even India. With some prodding, she acknowledged the truth. “They’re all Chinese,” she said, declining to give her name lest it hurt her business. “But if I say they’re Chinese, they don’t sell.”

Even those who benefit from China’s growth express some wariness. Aerospace giant Boeing expects China to be the largest market for commercial air travel outside the United States in the next 20 years, buying more than $100 billion worth of commercial aircraft, U.S. trade envoy Karan Bhatia said in a recent speech.

“Right now, we’re hiring every week,” noted Connie Kelliher, a union leader. “Things couldn’t be better.”

Yet Boeing workers remain wary of China’s ambitions to build its own planes. next year China plans to test-fly a locally made midsize jet seating 78 to 85 passengers. It has also announced plans to roll out a 150-seat plane by 2020.

“It’s kind of a double-edged sword,” Kelliher said. “You want the business and we want to get the airplane sales to them, but there’s the real concern of giving away so much technology that they start building their own.”

That’s what happened to Western and Japanese automakers, which made inroads in the Chinese market only to see their designs copied and technologies stolen. Already, China’s vehicle manufacturers are venturing overseas, exporting 325,000 units last year — mostly low-priced trucks and buses to Asia, Africa and Latin America.

“We’re taking a bigger piece of the pie,” said Yamilet Guevara, a sales manager for Cinascar Automotriz, which has opened 20 showrooms in Venezuela in the past 18 months, offering cars from six Chinese makers. “They ask by name now. It’s no longer just the Chinese car. It’s the Tiggo, the QQ.”

China’s biggest car company, Chery Automobile Co., just announced a deal with the Chrysler Group to jointly produce and export cars to Western Europe and the United States within 2-1/2 years.

Given the speed of China’s ascent, it’s perhaps not surprising that China itself is trying to calm some of the fears. Its slogan for the Beijing Olympics: “Peacefully Rising China.”

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$200m sugarcane project launched
By ANGELA CHISHIMBA
 

PRESIDENT Mwanawasa yesterday launched the Nakambala sugarcane expansion project estimated to cost US$200 million. President Mwanawasa said the expansion project had put Zambia in the league of the major sugar producers in the world.

“It is good that Zambia will not only be known by its production of copper but sugar as well,” he said.

The project would expand the country’s sugar exports mainly to the European Union.

He said the project would ensure increased income and creation of more jobs.

The President said the production of ethanol by Zambia Sugar would also help reduce the import bill for petroleum.

He was confident that most of the US$200 million to be pumped into the expansion programme would come from Zambian banks, which would in turn derive profits out of it.

Mr Mwanawasa urged Zambians to position themselves and ensure they benefited from the project.

He appealed to the Zambia Sugar management to continue supporting indigenous Zambians in order to support the Citizens Economic Empowerment Act.

He urged management to assist local people to take advantage of business opportunities that may arise following the launch of the expansion programme.

He was glad that Zambia Sugar Company decided to invest in Zambia at a time when most investors feared to invest in the country.

He said Zambia was an investor-friendly country.

He paid tribute to traditional leaders in Southern Province for releasing land to put up the Albidon Nickel Mining and Zambia Sugar expansion projects.

Mr Mwanawasa also urged investors to pay attention to concerns of local communities.

“Investors should ensure that they take the owners of the land on board,” he said.

President Mwanawasa also held a meeting with the company to discuss labour matters.

He could not, however, disclose what had been discussed.

And Zambia Sugar managing director, Paul de Robillard, said the sugarcane expansion project was approved at a cost of K840 billion on March 28, 2007.

The project is based on a 50 per cent increase in cane crushing capacity of the factory, linked to expanded sugar cane growing and the construction of new canals to deliver irrigation water to new areas of sugarcane development.

The project will also result in Zambia Sugar becoming fully self-sufficient in its own electricity requirements.

Mr de Robillard said the anticipated growth in production would come from a combination of Zambia Sugar’s own estate operations, commercial out-growers and small-scale grower schemes, both new and existing, totalling 10,500 hectares.

He said the first phase of the expansion had started and would be completed in time for the sugar season in April 2008.

Mr de Robillard said as an alternative market, the unrestricted European market access entitlements for least-developed countries (LDCs), including Zambia, to be effected in 2009, would provide a minimum underpin price for the increased production.Under the EU reformed sugar regime, the price for bulk raw sugar would be guaranteed at a level that is 33 per cent lower than the existing price.

Mr de Robillard said the unrestricted nature of this initiative for sugar exporters in LDCs would also enable Zambia access the full value chain existing in the EU sugar market.

This would open opportunities to earn commercial premiums currently not available to exporters due to the EU’s restricted quota system.

He said molasses production would increase to 95,000 tons by the end of the project and at that stage, a feasibility study to investigate the production of alcohol for national fuel pool would be undertaken.

“It is envisaged that if viable, an ethanol plant would be able to supply approximately 10 per cent of the country’s fuel requirements,” he said.

Source: Zambia Daily Mail