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Microsoft Corporation has officially opened its online office document-sharing site. Office Live Workspace is a public open beta site, available to anyone with a Windows Live ID.

The focus of the site is the ability for users to share and save documents online.Users must have Microsoft Office applications – Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook – installed on their computers to take advantage of the capabilities of the online site.

According to a report in PC Magazine, you start by setting up an account using a Windows Live ID, and can then create multiple Workspaces for any groups you want to collaborate with. You can then share documents with others through e-mail invitations.

You assign rights to your invitees allowing them to either edit the documents or view only. An Office Live toolbar installed in Office applications gives participants the choice to save documents to or open them from any shared Workspace. One user has the right to share documents with up to 100 other people.

Microsoft envisions the site as a gathering place for work, school, and personal projects, where multiple users can share the material and work collaboratively online. The site is also useful for users who work remotely or in multiple locations and want to make files accessible to themselves online. The space limit for online storage is 500 MB, which Microsoft equates to as many as 1,000 documents or more, including picture files. The service works in Internet Explorer 6.0 or later on Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Vista; Firefox 2.0 on Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Vista; or Firefox 2.0 on Mac OS X 10.2.x and later.

There is no cost to use Microsoft Office Live Workspace beta, however the site may eventually include advertising, and fee-based services might be added in the future, according to descriptive information on the Microsoft Office Live Workspace Web site.

Initially, Microsoft Office Live Workspace is available as a beta service to a limited number of people while Microsoft finalizes the product. Potential users can sign up for pre-registration by using an existing Windows Live ID or creating a new one. Microsoft will send out an invitation as soon as your workspace is ready. More people are being added to the project each week.

You can sign up for free or view a video that describes the service by going to workspace.officelive.com.

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Seattle Times staff columnist

Our relationships with the rest of the world need some updating.

Things are changing. A large delegation from Zambia was in Seattle this week making a case for investment, not charity, as the cure for poverty.

It’s an argument many in Africa have been making for years, usually in the other Washington.

While few in the world’s leading capitalist nation are biting, China is pouring money into the continent in search of influence and profit. In Zambia, the Chinese invest in mining, retail and construction.

Viewed from the U.S., Africa seems a solid mass of disease, war, unstable dictators and rampant corruption.

The Zambian delegation, including the country’s president, argued that this view is full of stereotypes that do not apply to their country.

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Zambia is a country of 12 million in southern Africa. Copper mining is central to the economy, but tourism, manufacturing and agriculture are growing.

The Zambians were invited way out west to Seattle by the Initiative for Global Development, which believes eradicating deep poverty would eliminate many of the ills, including diseases and conflicts, that afflict the planet.

Members call themselves “business leaders working to end poverty.”

Getting people out of poverty is the right thing to do, but it also can be profitable for business and relieve governments in developed nations of numerous international headaches.

The U.S ambassador to Zambia has said a stable Zambia contributes to the U.S. goal of peace, democracy and economic growth in southern Africa.

IGD was founded three years ago by Bill Gates Sr.; Daniel J. Evans, the former senator and governor; former EPA administrator Bill Ruckelshaus; Weyerhaeuser heir Bill Clapp; and John Shalikashvili, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

The delegation also scheduled meetings at Starbucks, Microsoft, Boeing and elsewhere.

levy_combine300.gifAt the session I attended, the president, Levy Mwanawasa, and his ministers made a compelling case for investment. How’d you like to pay no taxes on business earnings?

They talked about their new zero-tolerance policy on corruption and their commitment to democracy, stability and economic growth.

And, said the minister of commerce, trade and industry, the weather is perfect.

What are we waiting for?

Well, actually, the weather isn’t perfect. It gets pretty hot there, and then there is the matter of infrastructure, and if they have cured corruption they are the only nation anywhere to have done so.

Zambia still has problems, but curing poverty would help solve them.

Business investment (not exploitation) is necessary.

Mwanawasa invited American entrepreneurs to visit and see that “the truth is the opposite of what you think is true.”

It’s not exactly the opposite, but Zambia seems to be at a point where investment could benefit Zambians and offer the U.S. new opportunities to make money and make friends.

Jerry Large’s column appears Monday and Thursday. Reach him at 206-464-3346 or jlarge@seattletimes.com.

Copyright © 2007 The Seattle Times Company

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Seattle Times business reporter

GREG GILBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Zambian President Levy Mwanawasa battles stereotype of Africa in chaos.

Even for a country with a relatively stable democracy and growing economy, Zambia hasn’t had much luck finding Americans willing to invest there.

Zambian President Levy Mwanawasa said he hopes to change that by introducing more Americans to his country and fighting the stereotype of Africa as a place defined by war and chaos.

Speaking to local business leaders Monday, Mwanawasa said Zambia has become a center of peace and prosperity in the region. The country has emerged from a long period of economic decline to achieve an average annual 5 percent growth in gross domestic product for the last five years.

“It’s the first time the country is experiencing such strong positive results,” the Zambian leader said, adding that sustaining the success could bring about an economic transformation to improve the lives of ordinary people.

The landlocked country of 12 million people in southern Africa still suffers from high unemployment and crippling poverty, with about 68 percent of the population falling below the poverty line of $1 per day.

Zambia has taken a strong stance against corruption and created a foundation based on the rule of law and respect for private property, Mwanawasa said.

The country’s main industries are copper mining, agriculture, manufacturing and tourism.

A former British protectorate that gained independence in 1964, Zambia is encouraging more foreign direct investment and growth of the private sector to help reduce poverty.

“When you invest in Zambia, you’re putting GDP in the pockets of Zambian people,” Mwanawasa said.

Mwanawasa, 59, was in the United States for a meeting of the U.N. General Assembly. He traveled here at the invitation of the Seattle-based Initiative for Global Development, a national network of business leaders promoting policies to end global poverty.

He and a delegation of senior government officials and business leaders were scheduled to visit the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, PATH, Microsoft, Boeing and Starbucks on Monday.

Mwanawasa said he had dinner Sunday at the house of former Microsoft executive Paul Maritz, a Zimbabwe native who lives on Mercer Island.

While Zambia has had a rush of investment from China recently, attracting U.S. business has been an uphill battle.

On previous visits to the U.S., “the response hasn’t been encouraging,” Mwanawasa said.

“So far Africa has been known only for the bad news,” said Felix Mutati, Zambia’s minister of commerce. “In Africa, we’ve got problems with HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases,” he said, “but we’re not a diseased country.”

In Zambia, the Gates Foundation funds a malaria-control program run by PATH that aims to cut malaria cases by 75 percent and become a model for the rest of Africa.

Zambia has introduced incentives to encourage foreign enterprises, such as tax-free profits for the first five years and duty-free imports of capital equipment, said Mutati.

Energy, IT infrastructure, agriculture and eco-tourism are promising areas for development, he added.

“We don’t want help,” Mutati said. “We want investment. We want partnership.”

Zambia’s slide into poverty began after world copper prices fell in the 1970s. Since then, the economy has become somewhat more diversified, even as the price of copper has climbed.

The government began privatizing the copper industry in the 1990s. Copper contributed 75 percent of the GDP in 2002 but only about 45 percent last year, said Mutati.

Asked about the political and economic crisis in neighboring Zimbabwe, Mwanawasa called the situation “extremely worrying” but added that economic sanctions will not help.

He threatened to boycott a European-African summit meeting in December if Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe was excluded, saying Western leaders must be willing to talk to the leader widely considered an international pariah.

The chaos in Zimbabwe has choked off tourism, diverting more visitors to Zambia to see Victoria Falls, the spectacular milewide waterfall on the border between the two countries.

With room for only about 1,500 visitors, hotels in nearby Livingstone can’t cope with the influx, Mutati said. Its tiny airport, which had just a few flights a week three years ago, has 28 flights a week now. Several new hotels are under construction.

While Chinese companies have been criticized for labor practices in Africa, overall the influx of investment from China has been a good thing, Mutati said.

Cautious Western companies have hesitated too long. “They would go on their computers and do spreadsheets about risk,” he said, while “the Chinese make a decision first.”

Chinese have invested $900 million in Zambia for two economic zones focused on copper and agricultural processing, creating 60,000 jobs.

“Now we can see the West is saying we must run to Africa because if China dominates Africa, that sphere of influence can become critical as we go forward,” Mutati said.

Zambia also needs American-style business, said Wamulume Kalabo, chairman of the Zambia Association of Chambers of Commerce and Industry.

U.S. companies tend to hire and train local people, with English as a common language. Chinese companies tend to hire their own citizens to work in Zambia’s mines and manufacturing sites because of the difficulty of communicating.

“The local people are not seeing the benefit initially,” Kalabo said, “because very few of them are being absorbed into the system, and the main reason is the lack of communication.”

Kristi Heim: 206-464-2718 or kheim@seattletimes.com

Copyright © 2007 The Seattle Times Company

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* * * * * * *

Bill Gates, Microsoft
Estimated Net Worth: $56 billion

The second richest man in the world is also arguably the most philanthropic in history. He and his wife preside over the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, with its $33 billion endowment–not including the additional $31 million committed by Warren Buffett last year.

Among his many goals is to increase the agricultural productivity of African farmers, develop preventative treatments for malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, and expand financial services to the poor. “The philosophy that Carnegie had in The Gospel of Wealth,” Bill Gates told Charlie Rose last summer, “It really helped me think about philanthropy, and, you know, how you ought to set very high goals.” Bill Gates will this year leave his position at Microsoft to solely concentrate on philanthropic work around the world using Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

* * * * * * *

Pierre Omidyar, eBay
Estimated Net Worth: $8.8 billion

The eBay founder is a vocal proponent of microfinance–small loans to those generally too poor for traditional bank loans–as a method of cultivating entrepreneurship in Africa. Two years ago he and his wife Pamela donated $100 million to Tufts University to create a microfinance fund that will provide millions of loans, some as small as $40, in developing African and Latin countries.

* * * * * * *

 

Oprah Winfrey
Estimated Net Worth: $1.5 billion

Earlier this year the Queen of All Media opened the $40 million Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls outside Johannesburg, South Africa. Two months later she cut the ribbon on another. Her charity, the Angel Network, raises funds for everything from HIV/AIDS treatment for African communities ravaged by the disease to Christmas gifts for African orphans.

* * * * * * *

 

George Soros, Hedge Funds
Estimated Net Worth: $8.5 billion

Soros’ investment in Africa began in 1979 when the already wealthy financier helped bankroll the educations of black students attending the University of Cape Town in apartheid South Africa. Among his many recent projects on the continent are the funding of free and open media, greater public participation and local government, and compliance of African nations to human rights. Last year Soros pledged $50 million to support the Millennium Villages, some 30 villages in sub-Saharan Africa in need of health, education and farming support.

* * * * * * *

 

ALTStephen Case, AOL
Estimated Net Worth: $1 billion

Through his Case Foundation, the former AOL chairman and his wife Jean have committed at least $5 million to PlayPumps, which builds water pumps that also function as merry-go-rounds for rural African communities in dire need of clean drinking water. The Foundation also provides fund-raising expertise and support to KickStart, which sells low-cost farming tools and supplies to help African families “kick-start” their family’s economic growth. During her last visit to Zambia, US First Lady Laura Bush visited PlayPump at a Basic School in Lusaka promoted by Stephen Case’s philanthropy.

* * * * * * *

 

Sanford “Sandy” Weill, Citigroup
Estimated Net Worth: $1.6 billion

The retired Citigroup chairman is now an active philanthropist. As chairman of the board of the Weill Medical College of Cornell University, he is overseeing the development of a medical center in Tanzania, where an estimated 9% of the population is afflicted with HIV/AIDS. Weill’s wife Joan sits on the board of the Touch Foundation, through which the couple have donated millions to underwrite medical training for Tanzanian doctors and care workers.

* * * * * * *

 

ALTWarren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway
Estimated Net Worth: $52 billion

Last year, the Oracle of Omaha, and until recently the second-richest man in the world, committed $31 billion of his fortune to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which is particularly active in alleviating poverty and promoting sustainable growth in Africa. Buffett and the Gates’ appeared on PBS’ TheCharlie Rose Show last summer to discuss the gift. “The diseases we’ve already been working on and the education and the inequities that we’ve been looking at for so long just basically doubled by Warren’s gift,” Melinda Gates remarked.

* * * * * * *

 

ALTThomas Hunter, West Coast Capital
Estimated Net Worth: $1.1 billion

The Scottish billionaire plowed proceeds from the 1998 sale of his sneaker business into West Coast Capital, which invests primarily in real estate and retail businesses. Two years ago, he hooked up with former President Bill Clinton to launch the Clinton-Hunter Development Initiative, which he seeded with $100 million. The funds will help provide health care, clean water, sanitation and security in Rwanda and Malawi. Hunter has also committed $12 million to UNICEF’s food program in Niger.

Of the eight philanthropists above – now commonly known as ” Billionaires For Africa”, seven of them live in the United States of America and the only black is a woman from Chicago, IL … thanks a trillion

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.

  

Choose Your Language Of Preference Below 

French Version   German Version   Russian Version   Spanish Version 

Portuguese Version           Chinese Version            Arabic Version 

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

Bill Gates, Microsoft
Estimated Net Worth: $56 billion 

The second richest man in the world is also arguably the most philanthropic in history. He and his wife preside over the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, with its $33 billion endowment–not including the additional $31 million committed by Warren Buffett last year.

Among his many goals is to increase the agricultural productivity of African farmers, develop preventative treatments for malaria, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis, and expand financial services to the poor. “The philosophy that Carnegie had in The Gospel of Wealth,” Bill Gates told Charlie Rose last summer, “It really helped me think about philanthropy, and, you know, how you ought to set very high goals.”  Bill Gates will this year leave his position at Microsoft to solely concentrate on philanthropic work around the world using Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. 

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

Pierre Omidyar, eBay
Estimated Net Worth: $8.8 billion

The eBay founder is a vocal proponent of microfinance–small loans to those generally too poor for traditional bank loans–as a method of cultivating entrepreneurship in Africa. Two years ago he and his wife Pamela donated $100 million to Tufts University to create a microfinance fund that will provide millions of loans, some as small as $40, in developing African and Latin countries.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

 

Oprah Winfrey
Estimated Net Worth: $1.5 billion

Earlier this year the Queen of All Media opened the $40 million Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls outside Johannesburg, South Africa. Two months later she cut the ribbon on another. Her charity, the Angel Network, raises funds for everything from HIV/AIDS treatment for African communities ravaged by the disease to Christmas gifts for African orphans.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

 

George Soros, Hedge Funds
Estimated Net Worth: $8.5 billion

Soros’ investment in Africa began in 1979 when the already wealthy financier helped bankroll the educations of black students attending the University of Cape Town in apartheid South Africa. Among his many recent projects on the continent are the funding of free and open media, greater public participation and local government, and compliance of African nations to human rights. Last year Soros pledged $50 million to support the Millennium Villages, some 30 villages in sub-Saharan Africa in need of health, education and farming support.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

 

ALTStephen Case, AOL
Estimated Net Worth: $1 billion

Through his Case Foundation, the former AOL chairman and his wife Jean have committed at least $5 million to PlayPumps, which builds water pumps that also function as merry-go-rounds for rural African communities in dire need of clean drinking water. The Foundation also provides fund-raising expertise and support to KickStart, which sells low-cost farming tools and supplies to help African families “kick-start” their family’s economic growth. During her last visit to Zambia, US First Lady Laura Bush visited PlayPump at a Basic School in Lusaka promoted by Stephen Case’s philanthropy.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

 

Sanford “Sandy” Weill, Citigroup
Estimated Net Worth: $1.6 billion

The retired Citigroup chairman is now an active philanthropist. As chairman of the board of the Weill Medical College of Cornell University, he is overseeing the development of a medical center in Tanzania, where an estimated 9% of the population is afflicted with HIV/AIDS. Weill’s wife Joan sits on the board of the Touch Foundation, through which the couple have donated millions to underwrite medical training for Tanzanian doctors and care workers.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

 

ALTWarren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway
Estimated Net Worth: $52 billion

Last year, the Oracle of Omaha, and until recently the second-richest man in the world, committed $31 billion of his fortune to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which is particularly active in alleviating poverty and promoting sustainable growth in Africa. Buffett and the Gates’ appeared on PBS’ TheCharlie Rose Show last summer to discuss the gift. “The diseases we’ve already been working on and the education and the inequities that we’ve been looking at for so long just basically doubled by Warren’s gift,” Melinda Gates remarked.

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

 

ALTThomas Hunter, West Coast Capital
Estimated Net Worth: $1.1 billion

The Scottish billionaire plowed proceeds from the 1998 sale of his sneaker business into West Coast Capital, which invests primarily in real estate and retail businesses. Two years ago, he hooked up with former President Bill Clinton to launch the Clinton-Hunter Development Initiative, which he seeded with $100 million. The funds will help provide health care, clean water, sanitation and security in Rwanda and Malawi. Hunter has also committed $12 million to UNICEF’s food program in Niger.

Of the eight philanthropists above – now commonly known as ” Billionaires For Africa”, seven of them live in the United States of America and the only black is a woman from Chicago, IL … thanks a trillion

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr. 

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle 

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle.  All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc. 

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.