Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)


Choose Your Language Of Preference Below

French Version German Version Russian Version Spanish Version

Portuguese Version Chinese Version Arabic Version 

By JAMES MUYANWA

levy.jpgPRESIDENT Levy Mwanawasa has told Zambians to prepare themselves to participate in global economy as Government increases citizens’ access to investments through the programmes of the Citizens’ Economic Empowerment Commission that kick off this year.

Addressing the nation on ZNBC radio and television on the even of the New Year, President Mwanawasa said that Government would increase the Zambians’ access to investment through the CEEC, which would enable all citizens, including women and the youth to have an opportunity to fully exploit their entrepreneurial abilities.

Dr Mwanawasa said the creation of multi-facility economic zone in Copperbelt and Lusaka provinces was another way of empowering the local people and uplift their standards of living through job creations.

He said Government on its part would continue implementing prudent macro-economic policies to safeguard gains made so far while ensuring the economic activities benefited the people. The focus for this year would, therefore, to grow the economy by at least seven per cent, he said.

Dr Mwanawasa said Government was keen to ensure that Zambians fully participated in the economic affairs at all levels including the international one, and urged the Zambian private sector to actively participate in the procurement and exploration of petroleum.

Dr Mwanawasa said Government had worked hard to overcome the challenges, which had been causing the intermittent disruptions in the supply of petroleum. Government had now introduced a long-term supply system, he said.

“As regards petroleum exploration, I am pleased to note that in the past year, Government has engaged stakeholders in order to finalise proposed amendments to the Petroleum Exploration Act of 1985,” he said.

Dr Mwanawasa said as soon as amendments to the Act were effected the nation would witness exploration activities in some provinces particularly North-Western Province where selected blocks had already been demarcated.

On mining, he said, the sector had made tremendous achievements and attracted huge investments but the onus was now on the Government to ensure that full benefits were derived from the ventures.

He said it was for that reason that this Government had engaged mining companies to re-negotiate the mining development agreements, which he said, would be concluded soon.

“Fair-minded and objective people will agree that so far, our economic, political and social programmes are on the right track. This is evidenced by the positive economic developments. “At the macro-economic level, the economy has continued to perform very well,” he said.

Source: Times Of Zambia

Advertisements

Choose Your Language Of Preference Below

French Version German Version Russian Version Spanish Version

Portuguese Version Chinese Version Arabic Version 

A great deal was accomplished last week in the Zambian Enterprise after the 338 members of the National Constitution Conference (NCC) were sworn in by the Chief Justice.

Now, whether some of them understood what they were up to, we don’t know but they are part of history in making for the Government of the Republic of Zambia (GRZ). 

Every body wants the best constitution possible and most want to copy from others out there so they can incorporate parts from them they think make those countries some with the best policy documents out there. 

If Kenyans ended up having the strongest constitution in the world, it is because they adopted a people-led path for its formulation. But overall, a constitution that lacks originality is just another document available for reference and not empowerment. 

Even the Constitution of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela is considered one of the best constitutions in the world because on paper it says all the nice things but its practical aspects are more despotic than republican despite being titled as such.  

For instance, Title 1 has 9 articles that are just the cream of the world for a people that have sovereign power to govern themselves. But overtly, Venezuela is considered a dictatorship in certain geo-political circles; despite strong reference to the preeminence of human rights, ethics and political pluralism espoused in Article 2 of its constitution.  

It is therefore, paramount that all the necessary aspects of our new constitution be of original intent not just be borrowed ideas that sound good on paper but show no originality. Those aspects need to relate to the Zambian Enterprise and its people on how we want to govern ourselves and how we want to prosper as a nation. 

A good constitution provides every citizen with the rights to nurture, it provides freedoms necessary to take advantage of all opportunities despite one’s background, it enhances every one’s chances to self-actualize and allows for every one to play their necessary roles in national development.

In 1795, Immanuel Kant in his philosophical sketch on perpetual peace wrote … “The only constitution which derives from the idea of the original compact, and on which all juridical legislation of a people must be based, is the republican.4

This constitution is established, firstly, by principles of the freedom of the members of a society (as men); secondly, by principles of dependence of all upon a single common legislation (as subjects); and, thirdly, by the law of their equality (as citizens).

The republican constitution, therefore, is, with respect to law, the one which is the original basis of every form of civil constitution. The only question now is: Is it also the one which can lead to perpetual peace?

In order not to confuse the republican constitution with the democratic (as is commonly done), the following should be noted. The forms of a state (civitas) can be divided either according to the persons who possess the sovereign power or according to the mode of administration exercised over the people by the chief, whoever he may be.

The first is properly called the form of sovereignty (forma imperii), and there are only three possible forms of it: autocracy, in which one, aristocracy, in which some associated together, or democracy, in which all those who constitute society, possess sovereign power.  They may be characterized, respectively, as the power of a monarch, of the nobility, or of the people.

The second division is that by the form of government (forma regiminis) and is based on the way in which the state makes use of its power; this way is based on the constitution, which is the act of the general will through which the many persons become one nation.

In this respect government is either republican or despotic. Republicanism is the political principle of the separation of the executive power (the administration) from the legislative; despotism is that of the autonomous execution by the state of laws which it has itself decreed.

Thus in a despotism the public will is administered by the ruler as his own will. Of the three forms of the state, that of democracy is, properly speaking, necessarily a despotism, because it establishes an executive power in which “all” decide for or even against one who does not agree; that is, “all,” who are not quite all, decide, and this is a contradiction of the general will with itself and with freedom.”

classy-daddy-3.gifWe are confident that all the 338 members of the NCC will take their duties seriously for the sake of the enterprise and will understand that this is a higher calling.

That calling demands a strong understanding of posterity and the knowledge of the fact that their work today will enhance our system of governance as a republic, afterall we are paying for it … 

Because the Zambian Enterprise is greater than any single one of us and that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian chronicle … thanks a trillion.

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.      

Choose Your Language Of Preference Below

French Version German Version Russian Version Spanish Version

Portuguese Version Chinese Version Arabic Version 

The Zambian Enterprise came out close to near bottom of the Global Competitive Index for the period 2007 – 2008. In this year’s report to be released on October 31, 2007, Zambia is ranked 117 out of the 128 countries evaluated for the period.  

The World Economic Forum, which compiles the report, is an independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging leaders in partnerships to shape global, regional and industry agendas. 

The Report will include The Global Competitiveness Index featuring the 12 pillars of competitiveness, The Business Competitiveness Index, detailed country profiles and data tables covering more than 100 social and economic indicators.  

The rankings are drawn from a combination of publicly available hard data and the results of the Executive Opinion Survey, a comprehensive annual survey conducted by the World Economic Forum together with its network of Partner Institutes (leading research institutes and business organizations) in the countries covered by the Report. 

This year, over 11,000 business leaders were polled in a record 131 economies worldwide. We wonder whether Zambia sent any of our business and or political leaders to this forum to represent our enterprise and make sure we were adequately represented.

That aside, human inclination tends to dispel such a poor overall performance by stating that Zambia needed to be given a fair stake in the matter considering all the purported strides since made on the economic front. Well, for Africa alone for instance, Zambia does not even appear in the top 10 most competitive countries for crying out aloud.

  Rankings For Africa – 2007

Growth Competitiveness Index

*** Zambia Not Even In Top 10 ***

Rank
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Country
Tunisia
South Africa
Mauritius
Egypt
Morocco
Libya
Algeria
Botswana
Namibia
Kenya
Score
4.72
4.42
4.22
4.09
4.02
4.00
3.98
3.83
3.76
3.61

It is worth mentioning here that our own analyses at the Zambian Chronicle have always been in line with the World Economic Forum’s assessments. We have been in the forefront on advising our Zambian Franchise that we have a great deal of competition around us. 

In Zambia we tend to over-dramatize issues; beating ourselves on the chest if you like. We beat our own drums without taking into account other externalities that really matter. It is this kind of myopic prescience that usually leaves us hanging when actual results are brought to bear. 

You cannot set your own standards as a country and want the world the judge you by those when the entire globe uses a different set of scenarios, such as ISO 9001.

For instance, around the world, productivity is a real measure of competitiveness and competitiveness leads to prosperity. As Jennifer Blanke, Senior Economist at the World Economic Forum explains in the video below, there are institutions, factors and policies that are required to be in place for a nation to be competitive. For the period under review, twelve pillars were used and only nine could relate to the Zambian Enterprise. To make matters worse, those that could relate painted a very sad picture in terms of scores. 

The first four pillars were classified under basic requirements and they included institutions required for normal business practices and we were ranked 56 out of 128 (perhaps one of our best in overall grading). 

The next pillar was infrastructure and we were ranked 90; third pillar was macroeconomics and we came out 122 (imagine that) while the fourth pillar in this category was health and primary education in which we came out as 118 (remember our article about how spending on education was pathetic?). 

In the efficiency enhancer, category three pillars were under consideration and they included the fifth pillar, which was higher education, and training and we came out 120; the sixth pillar of market efficiency earned us 86 and the seventh pillar of technological readiness we came out at 96. The last category we participated in was innovation enhancers, in which we actually came out to be at the bottom of the barrel. The eighth pillar was business sophistication and we had 128 out of 128 meaning we were the worst in the world. The ninth pillar is actually innovation; we came out 121 out of 128. 

It is no wonder we are always asking others to come and develop Zambia on our behalf.  The fact of the matter is, Zambia shall be developed by the Zambians for the Zambian but our current crop of politicians seems to denigrate Zambian ingenuity always looking outside for others to come and take the lead. 

classy-daddy-3.gifThe thumper mentality needs to end, the business of beating our own drums needs to end, the beating of ourselves on the chest needs to end and our state of mind needs to change if we have to play in the big league.

Let us for a change focus on what our institutions, our factors of production and our policies are before we can look elsewhere. 

Let us for a change use our debt-repayment savings and invest those into our children by providing quality education at all levels, providing exemplary health care for all our citizenry, and investing in our technological areas that encourage local innovation; that’s this week’s memo from us at the Zambian Chronicle … thanks a trillion. 

Brainwave R Mumba, Sr.

CEO & President – Zambian Chronicle

Copyrights © 2007 Zambian Chronicle. All rights reserved. Zambian Chronicle content may not be stored except for personal, non-commercial use. Republication and redissemination of Zambian Chronicle content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Zambian Chronicle. Zambian Chronicle shall not be liable for any errors, omissions, interruptions or delays in connection with the Zambian Chronicle content or from any damages arising therefrom.

Zambian Chronicle is a wholly owned subsidiary of Microplus Holdings International, Inc.

Copyrights © 2007 Microplus Holdings Int., Inc.         

Choose Your Language Of Preference Below

French Version German Version Russian Version Spanish Version

Portuguese Version Chinese Version Arabic Version

 

The Times of Zambia (Ndola)
 

 

Emmerson Muchangwe
New York

President Mwanawasa has arrived New York in the US ahead of a tight programme during this year’s regular session of the United Nations (UN) General Assembly.

Mr Mwanawasa, who arrived on Saturday night via London aboard a British Airways plane, was met at JFK International airport by Zambia’s Permanent Representative to the UN, Lazarous Kapambwe and other senior embassy staff.

The President was driven straight to New York’s Palace Hotel where he is staying.

At the hotel, the President was received by Zambia’s Ambassador to the US, Inonge Mbikusita Lewanika, deputy permanent representative, Benard Mpundu and several other embassy staff.

The President is accompanied by Foreign Affairs Minister, Kabinga Pande, Agriculture and Cooperatives Minister, Ben Kapita, Science and Technology Minister, Peter Daka, Health Minister, Brian Chituwo, Education Minister, Geoffrey Lungwanga, Commerce, Trade and Industry Minister, Felix Mutati, Secretary to the Cabinet, Joshua Kanganja and Foreign Affairs Permanent Secretary, Tens Kapoma.

During his stay in New York, Mr Mwanawasa, who is also Southern Africa Community Development (SADC) chairperson, will take part in various discussions, prominent among which will be one on climate change.

Mr Mwanawasa will start his activities at the UN by attending a reception to be hosted by Secretary General, Ban Ki Moon, for all Heads of State attending the General Assembly.

The President will the be among the other Heads of State and Government who will participate in the opening of the 62nd regular session.

Mr Mwanawasa will also make a presentation on climate where he is expected to give a general view of how the SADC region has been affected by the changes in climate and how the various countries in the region are responding to the challenges of adapting to climate change.

The President will be part of the discussants in the plenary session to look at the issue of adaptation in more detail.

In the second plenary session which will look at the mitigation aspect, the President will be represented in the discussion by ministers of Agriculture and Health, Mr Kapita and Dr Chituwo respectively while in the plenary session on technology, Mr Daka and Professor Lungwangwa ministers in charge of Science and Technology and Education respectively would be among the discussants.

Others expected to partcipate in the discussions are Mr Mutati and Dr Kanganja in the fourth plenary session on financing aspect in relation to climate change.

The President will, among other activities, on Tuesday meet with Mr Jack Grynberg of Grynberg Petroleum Company to discuss various issues pertaining to investment before taking part in the round table discussion on human rights and democracy later in the day.

Mr Mwanawasa will on Wednesday deliver another statement to the General Assembly after which he will attend a general debate on the 62nd regular session of the United Nations.

The President will on Thursday travel to Arkansas State where he will receive an award from the Harding University before returning to New York where he will have several engagements including a meeting with Zambians living in New York on Saturday, at the Zambian mission.

On Sunday, Mr Mwanawasa will travel to Seattle in Washingston State where he will attend a business forum as well as meeting with several chief executives of various companies based in the US.

The President is also expected to attend to a number of business engagements in London before returning home in the first week of October.

London Based Recruiter In Houston – Global Career Company Ltd

Choose Your Language Of Preference Below

French Version German Version Russian Version Spanish Version

Portuguese Version Chinese Version Arabic Version 

$200m sugarcane project launched
By ANGELA CHISHIMBA
 

PRESIDENT Mwanawasa yesterday launched the Nakambala sugarcane expansion project estimated to cost US$200 million. President Mwanawasa said the expansion project had put Zambia in the league of the major sugar producers in the world.

“It is good that Zambia will not only be known by its production of copper but sugar as well,” he said.

The project would expand the country’s sugar exports mainly to the European Union.

He said the project would ensure increased income and creation of more jobs.

The President said the production of ethanol by Zambia Sugar would also help reduce the import bill for petroleum.

He was confident that most of the US$200 million to be pumped into the expansion programme would come from Zambian banks, which would in turn derive profits out of it.

Mr Mwanawasa urged Zambians to position themselves and ensure they benefited from the project.

He appealed to the Zambia Sugar management to continue supporting indigenous Zambians in order to support the Citizens Economic Empowerment Act.

He urged management to assist local people to take advantage of business opportunities that may arise following the launch of the expansion programme.

He was glad that Zambia Sugar Company decided to invest in Zambia at a time when most investors feared to invest in the country.

He said Zambia was an investor-friendly country.

He paid tribute to traditional leaders in Southern Province for releasing land to put up the Albidon Nickel Mining and Zambia Sugar expansion projects.

Mr Mwanawasa also urged investors to pay attention to concerns of local communities.

“Investors should ensure that they take the owners of the land on board,” he said.

President Mwanawasa also held a meeting with the company to discuss labour matters.

He could not, however, disclose what had been discussed.

And Zambia Sugar managing director, Paul de Robillard, said the sugarcane expansion project was approved at a cost of K840 billion on March 28, 2007.

The project is based on a 50 per cent increase in cane crushing capacity of the factory, linked to expanded sugar cane growing and the construction of new canals to deliver irrigation water to new areas of sugarcane development.

The project will also result in Zambia Sugar becoming fully self-sufficient in its own electricity requirements.

Mr de Robillard said the anticipated growth in production would come from a combination of Zambia Sugar’s own estate operations, commercial out-growers and small-scale grower schemes, both new and existing, totalling 10,500 hectares.

He said the first phase of the expansion had started and would be completed in time for the sugar season in April 2008.

Mr de Robillard said as an alternative market, the unrestricted European market access entitlements for least-developed countries (LDCs), including Zambia, to be effected in 2009, would provide a minimum underpin price for the increased production.Under the EU reformed sugar regime, the price for bulk raw sugar would be guaranteed at a level that is 33 per cent lower than the existing price.

Mr de Robillard said the unrestricted nature of this initiative for sugar exporters in LDCs would also enable Zambia access the full value chain existing in the EU sugar market.

This would open opportunities to earn commercial premiums currently not available to exporters due to the EU’s restricted quota system.

He said molasses production would increase to 95,000 tons by the end of the project and at that stage, a feasibility study to investigate the production of alcohol for national fuel pool would be undertaken.

“It is envisaged that if viable, an ethanol plant would be able to supply approximately 10 per cent of the country’s fuel requirements,” he said.

Source: Zambia Daily Mail

Choose Your Language Of Preference Below

French Version German Version Russian Version Spanish Version

Portuguese Version Chinese Version Arabic Version

From Bwalya Nondo

Madrid – Spain

medium_flag_of_zambia1.gifone-zambia-one-nation.jpgZAMBIA has been elected vice chair of the Africa Working Group at the on-going United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) conference of the Parties eighth Session (COP8), in Madrid, Spain. 

Zambian delegates have also been co-opted into sub-committees of the Africa Working Group whose core objective is to make follow-ups on the 10-year UNCCD strategic plan which spells out measures to be undertaken in reversing or mitigating the effects of desertification.

One of the critical issues that call for the attention of developed country Parties is increased funding to give added impetus to African countries’ capacity to respond adequately to the challenge of fighting desertification. Alternate Head of the Zambian delegation to the conference, Godwin Gondwe, is Vice Chairperson of the Africa Working Group. 

Mr Gondwe who is also UNCCD focal point person for Zambia, expressed confidence that the African Group would make a break-through in convincing cooperating partners to consider increasing funding levels in aid of programmes and projects aimed at combating desertification and other environmental concerns across the continent.

Chairperson of the Africa Working Group, Ugandan Stephen Muwaya said implementation of the Convention on desertification would depend mostly on provision of adequate resources by the rich west. Mr Muwaya said Global Environmental Fund (GEF) had taken interest in supporting sustainable management of natural resources in developing countries.

He said this was critical in ensuring prevention of further desertification.
Mr Muyawa said addressing desertification concertedly was vital as this had a bearing on fighting poverty and achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and mitigating global warming.

Sub-committee working groups put in place include the Budget Group, Committee for Review of Implementation of the Convention on Desertification, the World Summit on Sustainable Development and Science and Technology.

Others are working groups on Global Mechanism and Global Environmental Facility, and the Contact Group on the 10-year strategic plan. Zambian delegates who have been co-opted into the sub-committees are director of forestry in the Ministry of Tourism, Environment and Natural Resources Anna Masinja, chief accountant, Lawrence Mulama and public relations officer, Bwalya Nondo, both from the same Ministry.

Others are director of planning in the Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Gideon Lintini, ZAFFICO general manager Obote Siakachite, Nyambe Sishekanu from the Ministry of Agriculture and Nasilele Lubinda from the Ministry of Finance.

http://www.times.co.zm/news/viewnews.cgi?category=4&id=1189146831